Thursday 29 September 2016

Lowest level of fatalities on Irish roads since record low in 2012

72 people have been killed on the roads to date this year

Paul Melia Environment Editor

Published 02/07/2015 | 09:59

Fixed-charge notices will be issued for cyclists breaking a red light
Fixed-charge notices will be issued for cyclists breaking a red light

THE number of people killed on the roads so far this year is down to levels not seen since 2012, when the number of fatalities were at a record low.

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New figures show that 72 people have been killed on the roads in 2015, down 24 on the same period of 2014.

This is the lowest level of fatalities in the first six months of the year since 2012 when 80 people were killed between January and June. That year, some 162 people died, a record low.

The figures emerged at a conference organised by the European Transport Safety Council, Road Safety Authority, Health and Safety Authority and Garda Siochana in Dublin’s Croke Park.

Focusing on the theme of workplace driving, the conference urged employers to make road safety a “critical part” of their business plans,

“Employers play a critical role in keeping our roads safe,” Transport Minister Paschal Donohoe said.

Read more: Penalty system for reckless cyclists needs to go much further

“They also have a legal responsibility to provide staff with a safe working environment, both in the office and on the road. This means ensuring employees who drive as part of their work are equipped with the skills and training to make them safer drivers.”

Gardai believe that as many as one in four injury collisions on the roads involve someone driving while working.

Superintendent Con O’Donoghue urged employers not to put employees under pressure to meet deadline or demand, or to take or make calls while driving, which would increase the risk of a serious collision occurring.

Separately, the minister also announced that gardai will be allowed impose fines of up to €40 for cyclists who commit one of seven offences.

The rules come into force from July 31 next.

The offences include breaking a red light, failure to have a front or rear lamp during lighting up hours, and cycling without reasonable consideration.

Cycling on a pedestrianised street, failing to stop for a school traffic warden and going through a level crossing while red lamps are flashing will also be an offence.

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