Wednesday 29 March 2017

Irish workers get the smallest number of days off each year

Workers in Ireland receive 21 days off on average compared to 30 in Finland, France and Germany. Picture posed
Workers in Ireland receive 21 days off on average compared to 30 in Finland, France and Germany. Picture posed

Irish workers get the smallest number of days off per year, according to new figures.

Workers in Ireland receive 21 days off on average compared to 30 in Finland, France and Germany.

The UK, Norway and Austria all had an average of 25 days; Ireland was the only country surveyed with an average under 24.

These figures come from a survey by Northstar on behalf of travel agent Expedia of 9,000 workers in 28 countries across Europe, Asia and the Americas.

Despite Ireland’s relatively low spot in Europe, Irish workers fared well overall, beating the US, Thailand, South Korea and Canada at 15 days.

Hong Kong workers fared worst overall with 14 days on average, although South Korean workers typically availed of only eight of their 15 days, making them the workers with the lowest actual time off. 

The country with the highest number of ‘unused’ days off was Japan at 10 days, meaning Japanese workers typically use only half of their allotted 20 days off.

“We’ve been looking at vacation and work life balance for more than a decade now and while many of the employed adults we survey agree that regular vacations are important for their general health and wellbeing, there are still plenty who have trouble maintaining the important balance between work and life,” said John Morrey, Vice President & General Manager of Expedia.com.

Interestingly, 68 percent of Spanish and United Arab Emirates workers said they felt “very or somewhat vacation deprived,” the most among all respondents, despite the fact that they both had 30 vacation days on average.

More vacation days were high on a list of what employees would value during negotiations with their employers, but flexibility of working hours was the highest ranked preference.

Online Editors

Promoted articles

Editor's Choice

Also in Irish News