Sunday 26 October 2014

Irish diners beware as cockroaches explode by 76pc

Laura Larkin

Published 02/07/2014 | 10:13

A cockroach Pic: Getty Images

DINERS are being warned to watch out for cockroaches when eating out as their numbers have 
increased significantly in 
Ireland in the last decade.

Going out for a meal 
increases the risk of coming into contact with the disgusting pest and punters are being warned that Irish restaurant staff may not be trained to recognise signs of a cockroach infestation.

The growing popularity of imported foods is thought to be partly responsible for the increase in the number of the insects here.

WORRYING

The number of cockroaches has increased by 76pc in the last 10 years.

Cockroaches pose a number of worrying health risks to 
anyone that comes into contact with them.

The pest carries salmonella, typhoid and gastroenteritis, while their droppings can cause both asthma and eczema.

Cockroaches cause a terrible odour in the place where they infest as well as posing health risks.

Dr Colm Moore, Area 
Technical Manager at 
Rentokil Ireland, advised the public to watch out for signs of 
cockroaches at home too.

He said: "They are nocturnal and hide during the day - you will most likely see them when turning on the light in the kitchen at night.

"You can also look out for egg cases and cast skins as they shed their skin five to eight times as they mature."

Proper waste disposal at home, particularly of food 
packaging, is also advised to avoid allowing colonies of the pest to take hold. Rentokil use various methods for tackling cockroaches including powerful sprays which they say are 
"innovative and environmentally friendly".

INFESTATION

Holidaymakers are also being warned to look out for a bug infestation of a different kind.

Bed bugs are a common 
occurrence during the summer season as holidaymakers check into hotels at home and abroad.

In order to avoid sleeping on a bed bug-infested mattress, people are advised to look out for signs that the bug has made its home in the bed.

These include blood spots or black marks on bed sheets or carpets.

hnews@herald.ie

Irish Independent

Read More

Editor's Choice

Also in Irish News