News

Saturday 20 September 2014

Irish benefactor offers old family home to evicted pensioners

Geraldine Gittens

Published 25/07/2014 | 18:20

  • Share
Martin and Violet Coyne at their home in Luttrel Park Drive in Blanchardstown, which they have been asked to leave due to the house being repossessed from their landlord. Picture: Arthur Carron
Martin and Violet Coyne at their home in Luttrel Park Drive in Blanchardstown, which they have been asked to leave due to the house being repossessed from their landlord. Picture: Arthur Carron
Martin Coyne (71)  Carpenterstown, Co. Dublin, leaving court after hearing
Martin Coyne (71) Carpenterstown, Co. Dublin

An Irish woman living in the US has offered her old family home to Dublin pensioners who face eviction from their rented property.

  • Share
  • Go To

Pam McMahon (42), originally from Meath but now living in Massachusetts, has offered her three-bedroom bungalow to Martin (71) and Violet (61) Coyne, for free.

The pensioners are living in fear of a knock on the door from the sheriff to evict them from the house they’ve rented for the past 14 years in Carpenterstown, west Dublin.

They are due to appear before the courts when a judge will determine whether to commit them to prison on contempt of court charges after they failed to vacate their home by midnight on Tuesday.

The couple were ordered by Judge Linnane to vacate the property after mortgage provider ACC Bank appointed a receiver to sell the property from their former landlord Daragh Ward in 2012.

This week they were given a five-week adjournment on their court date, but the couple say they could still be evicted if the county sheriff executes a court order for possession of the rented property.

Pam McMahon told independent.ie today that she wants to offer up her old family home to the couple.

“I was just appalled by the story. It’s so hard not to be frustrated by the system, the Irish system is a reactive system.”

“[The couple have] a right to say on some level, ‘the system should support us’.”

“I thought I’d reach out. I lost my sister and my parents to cancer and I always felt I’d give back in some way. I was young when I saw a lot of loss, and I said I’d always give back.”

She added: “I thought that the distress was written all over their faces.”

Martin and Violet have been searching for somewhere else to live but due to the massive shortage of rental accommodation in the capital and rents increasing by more than 25pc, they are stuck in limbo.

They applied for social housing through Fingal County Council but Mr Coyne said he was informed yesterday that it would be at least three or four years before they would get a place due to the huge backlog on the housing waiting list.

Pam said: “There’s only so much in the end that someone can be expected to take.”

“They deserve a new beginning. I’m a big believer in having goals. Like, what are you going to do now? What are your goals? Where do you see yourself a year from now?”

“I want them to be an inspiration for someone else.”

Read More

Editor's Choice

Also in Irish News