Wednesday 23 August 2017

Give bomb victims the truth, says Martin

SADNESS: Wendy Doherty at the ceremony marking the 41st anniversary of the Dublin and Monaghan bombings. Her pregnant mother Colette died in the attack.
SADNESS: Wendy Doherty at the ceremony marking the 41st anniversary of the Dublin and Monaghan bombings. Her pregnant mother Colette died in the attack.
Jim Cusack

Jim Cusack

More than 200 people yesterday attended an emotional commemoration to mark the 41st anniversary of the devastating Dublin-Monaghan bombings.

In all, 34 people - including a full-term unborn baby - lost their lives and nearly 300 more were injured when three bombs exploded in Dublin during the evening rush hour on May 17, 1974.

A fourth bomb exploded in Monaghan 90 minutes later.

Fianna Fail Leader Micheal Martin last night repeated calls for the British government to open its files for inspection by an independent commission.

Mr Martin said the new Conservative government in the UK now had a chance to take decisive action.

He said that handing over the files would help victims and their relatives to find the justice that has eluded them.

Mr Martin also suggested that handing over the files to a senior independent judicial figure is the "fairest way to deal with this legacy issue".

At the ceremony beside the victims' memorial on Dublin's Talbot Street, Lord Mayor of Dublin Christy Burke said there was no doubt that responsibility for the Dublin and Monaghan bombings lay with British intelligence services.

Mr Burke said he had personally heard the Dublin bombs detonate and he "knew on that day that we were dealing with British intelligence and other agencies or agents who decided to come to Dublin and attack the State".

Mr Burke called on the incoming British Government to publish its files on the bombings.

Addressing the crowd Junior Minister Aodhan O'Riordan said many of the gathering could clearly remember the horror, the tragic loss of life - and they continued to suffer the loss of their loved ones.

Among those present was Maura O'Hara who said she lost her first cousin Ann Marren.

Ms Marren worked with the P&T Department in Hawkins Street and was a native of Ballymote, Co Sligo.

Ms O'Hara stated that she still goes to a commemorative Mass every year to remember her cousin and the other victims.

The gathering was organised by the group Justice for the Forgotten.

The attack was carried out by loyalist paramilitaries. The UVF claimed it for theirs in 1993, and it remains the biggest terrorist attack in the history of the Irish State.

Sunday Independent

Editor's Choice

Also in Irish News