Wednesday 28 June 2017

Blue shark washes up on Irish shore day after beach carnival

The body of the shark was discovered on Monday
Photo: Cork County Council
The body of the shark was discovered on Monday Photo: Cork County Council
Blue sharks can grow up to four metres (13ft) Photo: Cork County Council
Tom, the Inchydoney Inshore Lifeboat man, with the blue shark Photo: Cork County Council

Cormac Fitzgerald

The body of a blue shark washed up on an Irish beach on Monday.

Lifeguards at Inchydoney Beach, Co Cork, discovered the deep-sea animal, which is common to the waters around Ireland.

There was relief that the shark didn’t turn up on the beach the day before, as Cork Surf Lifesaving were holding a beach carnival that day.

“Looks a lot like a Blue Shark to us... Thank God it didn't happen yesterday!” said a representative of Cork County Council Beach Lifeguard Service on their Facebook page.

Blue sharks can grow up to four metres (13ft)
Photo: Cork County Council
Blue sharks can grow up to four metres (13ft) Photo: Cork County Council

The blue shark is the most common shark in the world. It usually eats smaller fish, but has been known to attack larger animals too. 

Adults can grow to just under four metres (around 13ft) and can weigh up to 182kg.

Calvin Jones from Ireland's Wildlife said that the sharks don't pose a real threat to people.

"They're not really a threat to people at all.

Tom, the Inchydoney Inshore Lifeboat man, with the blue shark
Photo: Cork County Council
Tom, the Inchydoney Inshore Lifeboat man, with the blue shark Photo: Cork County Council

"People don't realise that we have quite a few shark species around Ireland," he said.

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