Saturday 23 September 2017

More are now double jobbing in bid to make ends meet

Aideen Sheehan

Aideen Sheehan

THE number of people working second jobs has soared by 22pc this year.

Central Statistics Office figures show that there are now 16,500 people who are double-jobbing to make ends meet.

There are 3,000 more people working two jobs than there were a year ago, which is up 22pc in the 12 months to the second quarter of 2013. This compares with a general rise in employment of just 1.7pc.

Overall there are 1.645 million people in full-time employment, and one in 100 of these also has a second job. That means the number of full-time jobs in the country is 1.662 million.

Most of those working two jobs are aged over 45 and male, the latest Quarterly National Household Survey report shows. About 11,500 men have a second job, compared with about 5,000 women.

Those working two jobs are also more likely to be self-employed. Farming and fishing was the single biggest sector where people were likely to be doing two jobs, accounting for 5,500 of the total.

This was even more true during the boom – the number of farmers with second jobs was more than 8,000 – probably because of huge opportunities in the building industry.

About 9,000 double-jobbers were in the services sector, which covers a huge spectrum from finance to catering.

However, double-jobbing was even more common towards the end of the Celtic Tiger, as the numbers working two jobs rose to 20,000 in early 2008.

SOARING

This may have been linked to soaring house prices, forcing buyers to take on extra work to meet mortgage repayments.

Total full-time employment fell by 303,100 in the past five years, the CSO figures show.

Figures show that the total number of people in work, both full-time and part-time, is now at 1.87 million, an increase of 1.7pc on 2012. The seasonally adjusted unemployment rate decreased from 13.8pc to 13.7pc.

Irish Independent

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