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Thursday 2 October 2014

Map reveals new gold concentrations in Ireland

Geraldine Gittens

Published 24/10/2013 | 15:24

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This map shows the concentration of gold in the border counties

Parts of Ireland could really contain a crock of gold afterall, even despite the absence of lucky leprechauns.

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According to a new gold map of the six border counties, anomalous gold concentrations have been found in certain areas.

The Tellus Border Project found previously unknown concentrations of gold in a number of areas, like parts of Inishowen in Donegal, Sligo,the Cavan-Monaghan border and Co Cavan.

But a spokesperson for the Geological Survey of Ireland told independent.ie that more gold exists in Ireland now than was previously thought.

The spokesperson said: "There are indications of gold in places other than what was known before."

"We knew already that there was potential for gold in Monaghan because of [the gold mine in] Clontibret and Conroy Gold working there, but there appears to be indications of gold in other counties now as well."

The GSI predicts that the number of companies applying for prospecting licences in the border counties will increase, which will pump over €1 million into the Irish economy over the next six years.

"It is hoped that following the publication of the map exploration companies will apply to prospect in the areas."

"Companies have to apply for prospecting before they can carry out exploration. In order to prospect, companies have to be on the ground doing surveys and it follows that they'll need staff. We haven't put a number of jobs on this yet. Some of these will be highly specialised job."

The survey is described the survey as a "top level survey" which reveals information on over 50 elements in soil, rocks, water safety and radon. Ultimately the geological survey will also have implications for health, agriculture and for the environment, the GSI says.

It also revealed some areas that might be at higher risk of radon than previously thought.

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