Wednesday 7 December 2016

Louis sex accuser seeks his privacy

Lawyers claim identification in Louis Walsh case would violate human rights

NIAMH HORAN and MAEVE SHEEHAN

Published 26/06/2011 | 05:00

CLOSING DOORS: Louis Walsh has endeared himself to the public and the media by his openness and accessibility. Photo: David Conachy
CLOSING DOORS: Louis Walsh has endeared himself to the public and the media by his openness and accessibility. Photo: David Conachy

THE man who claims he was sexually assaulted by pop impresario Louis Walsh moved to protect his privacy last night, as newspapers uncovered his identity.

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Solicitors acting for the man claimed that publishing his name would hamper the garda investigation into the allegation and would also be a "gross violation" of his human rights.

The legal threat came as Walsh, who has always been accessible to the media and members of the public, told the Sunday Independent that he plans to hire a "round the clock" security detail following the accusation.

"I can't live this way any more," he said. "I'm going to have to learn a new way of living my life."

On April 9 the man complained to gardai that he had been sexually assaulted inside the Krystle nightclub in Dublin -- an accusation vehemently denied by the millionaire X Factor judge.

Walsh, founder of Boyzone and manager of Westlife, learned that a complaint had been made to gardai last Wednesday night when he was contacted by a reporter from the Sun newspaper, minutes before he was due to go on a Channel 4 chat show with presenter Alan Carr.

Cosgrave Solicitors, acting for the man, yesterday contacted a number of newspapers threatening to take out an injunction to prevent their client being named.

They said that identifying him would be a "potential impediment to any ongoing or future investigation or inquiry".

The solicitors firm also officially confirmed that the man has made a formal complaint of sexual assault to the gardai.

Walsh was interviewed by gardai on Friday at the Four Seasons Hotel in Dublin. It is expected that the investigation will last for several weeks.

He has already employed a libel lawyer and is in contact with the Sun, demanding an apology over their front-page story, which the newspaper claimed was based on garda sources.

Sunday Independent

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