Saturday 22 July 2017

ISPCA rescues 90 dogs found in filthy conditions at puppy farm

The rescued dogs arrive at the ISPCA National Animal Centre in Longford. Photo: ISPCA
The rescued dogs arrive at the ISPCA National Animal Centre in Longford. Photo: ISPCA
The rescued dogs arrive at the ISPCA National Animal Centre in Longford. Photo: ISPCA
The rescued dogs arrive at the ISPCA National Animal Centre in Longford. Photo: ISPCA
The rescued dogs arrive at the ISPCA National Animal Centre in Longford. Photo: ISPCA
The rescued dogs arrive at the ISPCA National Animal Centre in Longford. Photo: ISPCA

Meadhbh McGrath

Some 90 dogs have been rescued from an Irish puppy farm after they were found living in filthy conditions.

ISPCA animal welfare officers responded to a request for assistance from a Local Authority after a licensed dog breeding establishment failed to comply with an improvement notice.

Upon visiting the premises, which had been registered under the Dog Breeding Establishment Act 2010, the ISPCA said the officers found dogs living in bare concrete runs “caked in their own faeces”.

Many of the dogs had serious skin conditions, eye and teeth problems that required immediate attention by a vet.

The rescued dogs arrive at the ISPCA National Animal Centre in Longford. Photo: ISPCA
The rescued dogs arrive at the ISPCA National Animal Centre in Longford. Photo: ISPCA

All of the dogs were signed over to the Local Authority, and 47 were passed into the care of the ISPCA while the remaining dogs are being looked after by Dogs Trust.

All of the rescued dogs are under three years old, and include Maltese, Bichon Frise, Shih Tzu, Jack Russell and Pomeranian breeds.

Among the total number there are 23 puppies, seven nursing mothers and one pregnant female.

ISPCA CEO Dr Andrew Kelly called for more consistent regulation of commercial dog breeding across the country.

The rescued dogs arrive at the ISPCA National Animal Centre in Longford. Photo: ISPCA
The rescued dogs arrive at the ISPCA National Animal Centre in Longford. Photo: ISPCA

“It is time for a debate on dog breeding on the scale we are seeing in some licensed breeding establishments around the country, some with more than 300 breeding female dogs,” he said.

He referred to research showing that puppies born in intensive breeding farms tend to have poorer personalities and may become fearful or aggressive later in life.

“Dogs are not cattle or sheep and have very different welfare needs including the need for socialisation and the company of humans. They simply do not get that in these large scale puppy farms,” he said.

Once they have been rehabilitated, the rescued dogs will be neutered/spayed, microchipped and responsibly rehomed by ISPCA and Dogs Trust.

The rescued dogs arrive at the ISPCA National Animal Centre in Longford. Photo: ISPCA
The rescued dogs arrive at the ISPCA National Animal Centre in Longford. Photo: ISPCA

Anyone who has information about rogue breeders or suspects an animal is being cruelly treated, neglected or abused is asked to contact the ISPCA National Animal Cruelty Helpline in confidence on 1890 515 515 or report online at iscpa.ie.

The rescued dogs arrive at the ISPCA National Animal Centre in Longford. Photo: ISPCA
The rescued dogs arrive at the ISPCA National Animal Centre in Longford. Photo: ISPCA

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