Monday 22 May 2017

Irish farmer's amazing drone footage of flying sheepdog goes viral

Farmer Paul Brennan is the proud owner of the world's first flying sheepdog

Sarah Stack

Sarah Stack

A sheep farmer who owns the world’s first flying sheepdog has revealed the Wall Street Journal was the first paper to call him when his drone footage went viral.

Paul Brennan uses a drone to herd his 150 sheep on his farm on the Carlow Laois border and said he was amazed when his work and hobby travelled worldwide.

His footage of Shep the Drone, which moves sheep from one field to another, has gone viral with more than 430,000 views on YouTube.

Mr Brennan, who also describes himself as an aerial photographer, said when thousands of people started viewing the footage online he expected to hear from his local papers the Carlow Nationalist and the Leinster Express first.

“For some reason it popped out of Ireland and went to the UK and States first,” he told Pat Kenny on Newstalk.

“The first paper to ring me was the Wall Street Journal.

Drone footage captured by sheep farmer and aerial photographer Paul Brennan (Skyfly Photography)
Drone footage captured by sheep farmer and aerial photographer Paul Brennan (Skyfly Photography)
Drone footage captured by sheep farmer and aerial photographer Paul Brennan (Skyfly Photography)

“They did a 30 minutes piece on me on the future of drones in agriculture.

"I’m the only man in my parish of Killeshin to be in Time magazine."

He was even on BBC 5 Live, where he joked that underfire presenter Jeremy Clarkson should do a show on One Man and His Drone if he was available.

However, Mr Brennan, who runs and farm with his brother Paul, said the farm’s sheepdog will not be forgotten.

“Shep is not going to be unemployed,” he joked.

“We might put him down to a three day week, give him two days off.  He can have a Pina Colada one day and let him enjoy himself."

Mr Brennan said he normally uploads footage and images of farmers working the fields throughout the summer.

“There’s nothing nicer than an aerial view of someone cutting barley on a lovely summers day and the golden corn. You won’t see a nicer thing.”

On a serious note, the farmer insists he is responsible when it comes to capturing and publishing footage of something he shouldn’t record.

“Drones have a bit of bad press for the likes of that,” he added.

“I’m responsible with a drone, I want the drone to take a photograph or do a bit of video it’s something that I love doing. It’s a hobby.”

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