Thursday 29 September 2016

Turbo-charged protein 'can fight any cancer'

Sarah Knapton

Published 18/04/2015 | 02:30

A protein which 'turbo-charges' the immune system so that it can fight off any cancer or virus has been discovered by scientists
A protein which 'turbo-charges' the immune system so that it can fight off any cancer or virus has been discovered by scientists

A protein which 'turbo-charges' the immune system so that it can fight off any cancer or virus has been discovered by scientists.

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In a breakthrough described as a 'game-changer' for cancer treatment, researchers at Imperial College London found a previously unknown molecule which boosts the body's ability to fight off chronic illnesses.

Scientists at the college who led the study are now developing a gene therapy based on the protein and hope to begin human trials in three years.

"This is exciting because we have found a completely different way to use the immune system to fight cancer," said Professor Philip Ashton-Rickardt, from the Section of Immunobiology in the Department of Medicine at Imperial, who led the study.

"It could be a game-changer for treating a number of different cancers and viruses.

"This is a completely unknown protein. Nobody had ever seen it before or was even aware that it existed. It looks and acts like no other protein."

The protein - named lymphocyte expansion molecule, or LEM, promotes the spread of cancer-killing 'T cells' by generating large amounts of energy.

Normally when the immune system detects cancer, it goes into overdrive trying to fight the disease, flooding the body with T cells. But it quickly runs out of steam.

The new protein causes an energy boost that makes T cells in such great numbers the cancer cannot fight them off.

It also causes a boost of immune memory cells which are able to recognise tumours and viruses they have encountered previously so there is less chance that they will return.

The team made the discovery while screening mice with genetic mutations. Researchers are hoping to produce a gene therapy whereby T cells of cancer patients could be enhanced with the protein and then injected back into the body.

The research was published in the journal 'Science'. (© Daily Telegraph London)

Irish Independent

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