Friday 28 July 2017

Supermarket soups can be laced with up to seven spoons of sugar

Sugar (Stock picture)
Sugar (Stock picture)

Jim Gallagher

Some "healthy" commercial soups contain a staggering seven teaspoons of sugar, a top chef has revealed.

Hilary O'Hagan-Brennan said one spiced chicken soup was made with 28 grams of sugar per tub. The World Health Organisation recommends people take no more than 24 grams a day.

Ms O'Hagan-Brennan reveals on RTE's What Are You Eating? that even a root vegetable soup, which people might assume was healthy, contained 16 grams of sugar, or four teaspoons.

"There is no place for added sugar in soup," she says.

And sugar wasn't the only hidden ingredient in our convenience foods, presenter Philip Boucher-Hayes discovered when he investigated.

He found that one third of us believe wraps are more healthy than traditional sandwiches.

But a large wrap can be equal to two slices of bread. And commercial tortillas are made with glycerol - a form of sugar - to keep them moist, and emulsifier to bind the ingredients together and extend their shelf life.

"Some chicken wraps have as many calories as a 12-inch pizza," he discovers.

Consultant dietitian Aveen Bannon reveals that while salads are good for you, the benefits are often undone by large amounts of dressing. An average tablespoon of mayonnaise contains 94 calories - and people often use two or three spoons with a salad.

'What Are You Eating?' RTE One, Wednesday, 8.30pm

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