Friday 9 December 2016

New treatments increase hopes of patients surviving blood cancer

Published 09/09/2016 | 02:30

Survival rates for patients who develop a type of blood cancer are improving significantly following new treatments. Stock Image
Survival rates for patients who develop a type of blood cancer are improving significantly following new treatments. Stock Image

Survival rates for patients who develop a type of blood cancer are improving significantly following new treatments.

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Around 250 people are diagnosed with multiple myeloma, and 170 die from the disease, every year, leading expert Prof Paul Richardson of Harvard Medical School told a meeting in Dublin.

"The last decade has seen multiple myeloma survival improve significantly," he said.

It has gone from an average of two to five years at best, to seven to 10 years or more, thanks to new therapies."

Multiple myeloma is a cancer of the blood arising from a type of white blood cell that is made in bone marrow.

Myeloma often affects many places in the body, which is why it is called multiple myeloma. It commonly affects the spine, skull, pelvis and ribs.

Irish Independent

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