Tuesday 26 September 2017

Mental health training call for colleges

Dr Esther Murphy, author of the report, and Ann Heelan, AHEAD Executive Director, at the launch of the Mental Health Matters report at the Department of Education Picture: Justin Farrelly
Dr Esther Murphy, author of the report, and Ann Heelan, AHEAD Executive Director, at the launch of the Mental Health Matters report at the Department of Education Picture: Justin Farrelly

College and university employees should have mandatory mental health training to deal with a surge in the number of young adults experiencing stress.

A report from the Association for Higher Education Access and Disability charity and the National Learning Network found that today's crop of post-secondary students are more commonly experiencing stress and anxiety than previous generations.

Some students particularly struggle with preparing any class presentations and have described themselves as "nervous wrecks" if required to present themselves in front of their peers.

The report entitled 'Mental Health Matters - Mapping Best Practices in Higher Education' - surveyed students at 22 post-secondary institutions nationwide.

It found that while the transition to college from secondary school is stressful for most people, it can be particularly challenging for those suffering from diagnosed mental illness or experiencing anxiety and depression.

Among a dozen recommendations contained in the report is that oral presentations be "reviewed" and both full and part-time college staff be given training in mental health awareness.

Irish Independent

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