Thursday 25 May 2017

Local area will benefit as Children's Hospital to generate 2,300 jobs

From left: Lorcan Birthistle, chief executive of St James’s Hospital, Eilish Hardiman, CEO of the Children’s Hospital Group, Dublin Lord Mayor Críona Ní Dhálaigh, Gordon Jeyes, independent chair, and project director John Pollock. Photo: Maxwells
From left: Lorcan Birthistle, chief executive of St James’s Hospital, Eilish Hardiman, CEO of the Children’s Hospital Group, Dublin Lord Mayor Críona Ní Dhálaigh, Gordon Jeyes, independent chair, and project director John Pollock. Photo: Maxwells
Eilish O'Regan

Eilish O'Regan

People living in the south inner city of Dublin, where long-term unemployment is higher than normal, will benefit from the 2,300 construction and service jobs to come during the building of the National Children's Hospital.

The pledge was made yesterday by the board overseeing the proposed €650m hospital, which it is hoped will get planning permission to be built on the site of St James's Hospital in Dublin.

A report commissioned by the board highlighted how it can become a hospital that would bring not only employment but increased spending and opportunities for people in the wider area,

Around 2,000 construction jobs will be created and 300 in services such as catering, security and administration, once the hospital is complete.

Project director John Pollock described it as a "once in a lifetime opportunity" and said locals would be supported with internships, job placements and labour activation schemes during the construction and operation of the hospital, which is due to open in 2020.

The report, compiled by Ernst Young, found 60pc of those on the Live Register in the area were long-term unemployed.

It warned that because of a number of factors, including the numbers with low basic education, there was likely to be a challenge ahead in "readying" people in the area to avail of the opportunities that would arise.

Eilish Hardiman, chief executive of the Children's Hospital Group, said the hope was that the application for planning permission, which was lodged in August, would be granted in February. If it gets the go-ahead, construction could start as early as next March.

Irish Independent

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