Friday 30 September 2016

'Legal high' drinks lead to trouble in schools

Neil Lancefield

Published 06/04/2015 | 02:30

Teachers have reported increasing concerns about the effect on behaviour, concentration and energy levels as a result of energy drinks, which contain high levels of caffeine and sugar
Teachers have reported increasing concerns about the effect on behaviour, concentration and energy levels as a result of energy drinks, which contain high levels of caffeine and sugar

Energy drinks are readily available "legal highs" that can impact negatively on pupils' behaviour in schools, it has been claimed.

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Teachers have reported increasing concerns about the effect on behaviour, concentration and energy levels as a result of the drinks, which contain high levels of caffeine and sugar.

A survey of teachers in one UK teaching union found that 13pc of respondents cited caffeine and energy drinks as a cause of poor pupil behaviour.

Chris Keates, the general secretary of the NASUWT union said: "This is the first time we have seen a significant number of teachers beginning to raise this as a concern.

"These drinks are becoming increasingly popular among young people and are often seen as simply like any other soft drink, but many young people and their parents are not aware of the very high levels of stimulants that these drinks contain.

"They are readily available legal highs.

"Teachers are reporting that this affects concentration in class and hyperactivity is then followed by the inevitable crash later in the school day when the impact of these drinks wears off," he said.

It is recommended that children should consume no more than 200mg of caffeine per day. Some 500ml cans of popular energy drinks contain 144-160mg of caffeine.

Irish Independent

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