Saturday 25 October 2014

Kodaline lend voice to 24-hour suicide helpline

Published 05/06/2014 | 02:30

Ireland’s rock sensations Kodaline have joined forces with Console to launch the national suicide prevention charity’s new 24/7 free helpline number 1800 247 247.
Ireland’s rock sensations Kodaline have joined forces with Console to launch the national suicide prevention charity’s new 24/7 free helpline number 1800 247 247.
Ireland’s rock sensations Kodaline have joined forces with Console to launch the national suicide prevention charity’s new 24/7 free helpline number 1800 247 247.
Ireland’s rock sensations Kodaline have joined forces with Console to launch the national suicide prevention charity’s new 24/7 free helpline number 1800 247 247.

Harry Styles is a big fan, and they wowed 20 million viewers when they appeared on 'American Idol' earlier this year – but Kodaline admit: "We all need support sometimes."

The band have launched a new free 24/7 helpline service, 1800 247 247, set up by Console, the national charity for suicide.

Console has warned of a 32pc rise in calls to its helpline in the last year – with over 4,000 calls in the last month alone.

The charity has noted an encouraging increase in calls from men under the age of 30, as well as from young people who may have lost a friend through suicide.

Lead singer of Kodaline, Steve Garrigan, urged those going through difficulties to seek help. "If you are facing a crisis, help is always just a free call away at any hour of the day or night, and the number couldn't be easier to remember," he said.

"Most of us don't live in a perfect world, we have all been through difficult times and we want people to know Console is there if they are having dark days.

"There is no shame in talking about your worries, we all have them and we all need support sometimes," he added.

Kodaline have previously spoken of their hope that their music will provide therapy for others.

CEO of Console Paul Kelly said it was now receiving over 4,000 calls, along with a substantial increase in texts to the helpline every month.

Young people, in particular, are "really starting to get the message" that help is immediately available, Mr Kelly said.

Irish Independent

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