Sunday 25 June 2017

Inspectors visited disability home after more than 20 reports of physical, psychological and verbal abuse

Concerns about the Ashington group home in Dublin 7 run by the Daughters of Charity (stock photo)
Concerns about the Ashington group home in Dublin 7 run by the Daughters of Charity (stock photo)
Eilish O'Regan

Eilish O'Regan

A inspectors’ visit to a north Dublin disability home was “triggered” by more than 20 reports of physical, psychological and verbal abuse in the space of a month.

A newly-published report by Hiqa, the patient safety watchdog, revealed concerns about the Ashington group home in Dublin 7 run by the Daughters of Charity.

They had received 21 notifications of peer-to-peer aggression between October and November last year, some of which happened in the early hours of the morning.

Inspectors made an unannounced visit to the home in November where ten female adults reside.

The report said they found that no one person has overall responsibility for the running of the home and it was very dependent on agency staff.

On the day inspectors visited, one of the workers had never been in the home before.

There was a deficit in training in areas such as how to respond if a resident is choking while there were also problems in relation to manual handling.

In response the managers said that additional staff have been hired to oversee supervision and training was also underway.

Hiqa published 26 reports on residential services for people with disabilities.

Inspections in 19 centres found a good level of compliance with the requirements of the regulations and standards. These included four centres operated by Muiríosa Foundation, three centres operated by Nua Healthcare Services, three centres operated by Peter Bradley Foundation Ltd, and four centres operated by Western Care Association.

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