Wednesday 20 September 2017

How sweet tooth could raise risk of Alzheimer's

An RTE Radio One listener is starting to resent her mother over her behaviour towards her father, ever since he was diagnosed with Alzheimer's
An RTE Radio One listener is starting to resent her mother over her behaviour towards her father, ever since he was diagnosed with Alzheimer's

Henry Bodkin

PEOPLE who eat diets high in sugar could be at greater risk of Alzheimer's disease, a study has suggested.

For the first time, scientists have established a "tipping point" link between blood sugar glucose and the degenerative neurological condition.

University of Bath researchers found excess glucose damages a vital enzyme involved with inflammation response to the early stage of the disease.

Abnormally high blood sugar levels, or hyperglycaemia, are a well-known characteristic of diabetes and obesity, and it is already understood that diabetes patients have an increased risk of developing Alzheimer's, where abnormal proteins aggregate to form plaque and tangles in the brain.

Now, however, scientists have unravelled the specific molecular link between glucose and Alzheimer's disease, suggesting people who consume a lot of sugar but are not diabetic are at increased risk.

Dr Rob Williams from the department of biology and biochemistry, said the discovery could eventually help to better identify those at risk of Alzheimer's and lead to new treatments or ways to prevent the disease.

Telegraph.co.uk

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