Friday 9 December 2016

Greyhound to help customers who switch from bags to wheelie bins

Jane O'Faherty and Paul Melia

Published 08/11/2016 | 02:30

Dublin councillor Gary Gannon had expressed concern that people living in flats and terraced houses would not have sufficient space to stow wheelie bins (Stock picture)
Dublin councillor Gary Gannon had expressed concern that people living in flats and terraced houses would not have sufficient space to stow wheelie bins (Stock picture)

Ireland's largest household waste company will help its customers switch to wheelie bins if it decides to cease collecting bags.

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Greyhound Recycling is considering ending its bag collection service on 900 streets in Dublin city, but says it will assess individual customers' needs.

Dublin councillor Gary Gannon had expressed concern that people living in flats and terraced houses would not have sufficient space to stow wheelie bins.

A spokesperson for Greyhound said the company accepted that customers who live on narrow streets or do not have gardens would have difficulties adjusting to bins.

"However, they are very much in the minority and the majority would be able to use wheelie bins," he said.

"We would look at it on an individual basis."

He said that the company would assist customers who would have difficulty moving their bins down stairs or through their homes.

Greyhound's managing director, John Brosnan, said bin bags had been a "source of risk" and that an employee had his hand pierced by a used syringe that was stowed in a bag.

EU legislation in July placed a ban on bin bag collection, but Dublin City Council allows for bag collection on just over 1,000 streets in the capital.

Meanwhile, other waste collection services said they would not be taking a similar stance to Greyhound.

John Dunne of Panda Waste Management said it had no plans to cease its bag collection service.

"It's not really an option I don't think," he said, adding that many streets in Dublin are too narrow for bin trucks, or do not have adequate space to store wheelie bins.

But Mr Dunne stressed that only 600 of its customers rely on bag collection services in the Dún Laoghaire area it covers.

"I have sympathy for Greyhound working in Dublin because they have a huge amount of [bin collections]," he said.

Stephen Martin of Advanced Waste and Recycling said his company would not immediately consider ceasing bag collection among its customers.

A Dublin City Council spokesman said it was up to Greyhound or any other waste collection firm to review elements of their service provision.

He added there are 1,005 streets in Dublin city where bag collections are still permitted.

The council is planning to review 560 of those streets to see where wheelie bin use could be increased.

Irish Independent

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