Saturday 10 December 2016

Gardaí called to Moore Street site after Department reports ‘unlawful entry’ and ‘continuous harassment’

Cian Murray

Published 08/08/2016 | 18:14

Heritage Minister Heather Humphreys and Minister of State Aodhán Ó Ríordáin in number 16 Moore Street in Dublin. Photo: Maxwells
Heritage Minister Heather Humphreys and Minister of State Aodhán Ó Ríordáin in number 16 Moore Street in Dublin. Photo: Maxwells

The Department of Heritage contacted Gardaí this morning after an alleged 'unlawful entry' to a site on Moore Street.

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The Department claims that employees of construction firm Lissadell Construction have been 'continuously harassed' as they attempt to carry out work on the site where the 1916 leaders held their last council of war.

Conservation activists have claimed that the Minister for Heritage Heather Humphreys is not taking the necessary steps to preserve the terrace.

They've hit out at the Minister by claiming she is refusing to allow an independent inspection of the works.

Patrick Cooney, a spokesperson from the Save 16 Moore Street Committee, told RTE that the department has engaged a 'demolition team' and that "there is no evidence of best conservation practice or specialist supervision".

Pictures on the 'Save Moore Street from Demolition' Facebook page shows protesters entering the site this morning, in what they call 'a citizens inspection'.

The Department of Heritage has rejected these claims, adding that the conservation of the Moore Street site is one of their primary objectives.

A spokesperson for the Department said in a statement: "The National Monument at Moore Street was entered unlawfully this morning, disrupting temporarily the completion of necessary preservation works approved by the High Court. The people concerned, who have not been identified, vacated the site after the intervention of Gardai."

They added that Minister Humphreys is doubtful that a conservation professional would enter the area.

The statement added: "In the Minister's view it is unlikely that any reputable conservation professional who would either be qualified or able to offer any judgement on the works would have gone on to the site in this unlawful manner. 

"Illegal entry onto the site, such as happened this morning, and the continuous harassment of the employees of Lissadell as they go about this necessary conservation work is, in fact, endangering the monument.

"The Minister is committed to carrying out the works approved by the High Court to preserve and protect the buildings in line with best practice conservation methods."

The statement also said that they are discussing what actions they will take following this morning's activity.

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