Friday 28 July 2017

Gallagher not ruling out political career if he loses election

Presedential candidate, Sean Gallagher leaves the polling station with his wife Trish at St. Oliver Plunkett National School, Blackrock, Co Louth after casting their vote. Photo: Collins
Presedential candidate, Sean Gallagher leaves the polling station with his wife Trish at St. Oliver Plunkett National School, Blackrock, Co Louth after casting their vote. Photo: Collins
Michael D Higgins and his wife Sabina and sons Michael Jnr and Daniel in Galway
Mary Davis arrives in her famous red dress to cast her vote with daughters Emma and Rebecca
Sean Gallagher exercises his franchise in Louth
David Norris on his way to the polling station in Dublin

Elaine Keogh

Presidential candidate Sean Gallagher has not ruled out a career in politics if he fails to reach the Aras.

Speaking after casting his vote in his home village of Blackrock, Co Louth, yesterday, the businessman also said he "never" had second thoughts about his decision to stand as a candidate.

When it was put to him that he had endured a tough final 72 hours in the campaign, he said: "This is what unfortunately the campaign ended up being about in the last couple of days.

He added: "We have always -- and the entire team throughout the country have always maintained -- a sense of dignity and decorum throughout this campaign because that's what the role demands and I think that's what the good people of Ireland deserve."

Asked if he had ever entertained second thoughts about standing, he said: "Never, never -- that's the challenge of stepping forward to stand for election, you must go forward with your conviction."

He has not ruled out a future in politics if he is not successful in being elected president.

"I'm going to take it one step at a time. I think we have plenty to focus on in the next 48 hours and I think one campaign at a time is enough to fight."

Mr Gallagher was approached by many well- wishers as he made his way to and from the polling booth where he and his wife Trish cast their votes.

However, he was not admitting whether he felt confident.

"Until the polls close and the results are out, all day today our volunteers will be getting voters out, getting the message out, we can't take anything for granted or be complacent in any way.

"The most important thing about elections is to make sure we have done all the work on the ground and I am so inspired and energised by the teams of thousands of volunteers who have come out over the last couple of months. It is really humbling.

"The challenge today is to get the vote out. I think we have run a very clean, positive campaign which resonated with people in every part of the country, in every sector, in every age group. So the challenge now is to make sure we get the vote out.

"Then it is down to the good people of Ireland to elect their next president."

Irish Independent

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