Tuesday 26 September 2017

Dublin City: Huge challenge ahead to tackle the housing crisis

Dublin City Council is facing a huge challenge to tackle the housing crisis in the capital.

The city has a growing population expected to reach near 600,000 in the next seven years and an ever increasing social housing waiting list.

There are plans to roll out a number of social housing regeneration projects on the back of billions of euros of Government investment.

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A major development in the Docklands, part funded by NAMA, is expected to result in 3,500 new homes, which will mostly be privately owned apartments. There are also planning applications for new apartment blocks in Hanover Quay and Boland's Mill.

New projects and expansion of complexes are also in the pipeline in Islandbridge and Anglesea Road.

There is some 61 hectares of derelict and vacant sites around the city which could be used to build around 3,000 new homes.

The Government is currently examining measures that could be used to free up these sites for development.

The council is insisting all new builds are spacious, have ample storage room and there is enough lighting in the living areas of the dwellings .

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The Residential Land Availability Survey map was created by drawing together zoning maps held by each local authority in the State.

Developed by the Department of the Environment, it sets out individual plots of land in towns, villages, cities and rural areas, and indicates the number of homes permitted on each site.

It took almost two years to develop, and provides planners and developers with an overview of the available land for housing.

It does not include land zoned for mixed-use development, which would generally include some housing provision. Nor does it include derelict sites.

The data is based on the situation as of March 31 last. Stage 1 land is considered not viable for development in the short-term because necessary services such as water are not in place. Stage 2 land has no major constraints. Not all the land has planning permission.

http://www.environ.ie/en/...

Irish Independent

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