Monday 24 April 2017

Family can not touch doorman with bullet in head

Shane Hickey

THE family of a doorman who was shot in the head outside a pub are not allowed to touch him in case it sparks brain activity which could further damage him.

Wayne Barrett (31) remains in intensive care with a bullet lodged in his head after he was one of three people shot by a lone gunman outside the Players Lounge in Dublin's north inner city at 12.30am on Monday.

Yesterday, his mother described how she breaks down every time she visits her son in hospital.

Mr Barrett's friend, Austen Purcell (24), who was also shot in the attack, is also still being treated in hospital, while a third victim of the shooting, Brian Masterson (30), has been released from hospital.

"There are specified visiting hours. Every time I go in I break down," Mary McNeil, Mr Barrett's mother, said on RTE's 'Liveline'.

"We are not allowed to touch him because they don't want any brain activity because of the injuries.

Republicans

"The bullet is still lodged in his head. It has broken up. If I touch him, the brain will register that. You can't touch him, you can't hold his hand."

Gardai are continuing to investigate the latest shooting in the capital and are looking into the possibility of the involvement of dissident republicans.

No arrests have been made as yet.

Mr Barrett's friends have been attending Beaumont Hospital, along with family members, where his condition is critical.

Ms McNeil said she had appealed to her son on a number of occasions to give up working as a bouncer and said she feared for his safety.

She was told of what happened in the early hours of Monday morning by her son-in-law.

"He said Wayne has been shot. My knees buckled and after that everything is a blank," Ms McNeil said.

"He is a big kid. I suppose you could say he is like a big teddy bear. Even the kids love him. Because he is such a big kid, he has a connection with all the kids."

Ms McNeil said that the family had been overwhelmed with the amount of help and sympathy which has been extended to them by members of the local community, neighbours and friends.

Her son is not an aggressive person, she said, and had frequently "walked and talked people out of that pub, maybe if they were too drunk".

Irish Independent

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