Saturday 3 December 2016

The real cost of stalemate may be high

Published 14/03/2016 | 02:30

It’s been two weeks since the results of General Election 2016 were revealed. And yet, we’re told, the leaders of the two largest parties in the State still haven’t shared so much as a phone conversation. Photo: James Flynn
It’s been two weeks since the results of General Election 2016 were revealed. And yet, we’re told, the leaders of the two largest parties in the State still haven’t shared so much as a phone conversation. Photo: James Flynn

There's no rush, they keep telling us. It could take a month, maybe longer, why the need for speed?

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Stop putting us under pressure, is the plea from our political leaders.

While nobody is under the illusion that the task of forming a coalition is easy and straightforward, we have reached a stage now where the grandstanding must come to an end.

It's been two weeks since the results of General Election 2016 were revealed and the best 158 candidates were given a seal of office by their own constituents.

And yet, we're told, the leaders of the two largest parties in the State still haven't shared so much as a phone conversation.

Well, gentlemen, try and explain that to the small business owner being crippled by debt and wondering if he should travel to the UK to declare himself bankrupt.

Or the expectant couple who were told, like so many others, that paid paternity leave would be available in September - a promise that may now be reneged upon.

This is the human impact of the current political stalemate.

Not for the first time, it is the coping classes of this country who will lose out the most if these talks are allowed to drag on for months.

Irish Independent

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