Wednesday 26 April 2017

One-in-five young teachers takes on two jobs to survive

ASTI president Ed Byrne said that lack of job security coupled with differential pay scales represented a critical threat to the future of second-level teaching and education in Ireland. (Stock picture)
ASTI president Ed Byrne said that lack of job security coupled with differential pay scales represented a critical threat to the future of second-level teaching and education in Ireland. (Stock picture)
Katherine Donnelly

Katherine Donnelly

Almost one-in-five secondary teachers, who qualified within the last seven years, is working at a second job to boost their income.

Only one-in-three who entered the profession in 2011, or since then, has a permanent teaching position.

These are two of the findings of a survey by the Association of Secondary Teachers Ireland (ASTI) carried out among the cohort of teachers worst affected by austerity-era cuts.

Almost half of those surveyed said that holding on to their current teaching job was their main career aspiration for 2020.

ASTI president Ed Byrne said that lack of job security coupled with differential pay scales represented a critical threat to the future of second-level teaching and education in Ireland.

There has been partial restoration of pay and conditions, including a reduction, from four years to two, in the length of time a teacher has to wait for a permanent contract, but ASTI members are not getting such benefits, because they have rejected the Lansdowne Road Agreement (LRA).

Meanwhile, the ASTI has fixed May 8-18 for a ballot on possible industrial action, in the event one of its members is threatened with redundancy from September.

Irish Independent

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