Wednesday 7 December 2016

No excuse for smelly socks in UCD's new student residence

Patrick Kelleher

Published 24/08/2016 | 02:30

Pictured at the opening of the student residences at Ashfield on UCD’s Belfield campus were students Matt Goins, Dylan Quinn McMahon and Jessica McHugh. Photo: Jason Clarke
Pictured at the opening of the student residences at Ashfield on UCD’s Belfield campus were students Matt Goins, Dylan Quinn McMahon and Jessica McHugh. Photo: Jason Clarke

UCD's new student residence is nothing like the grotty and smelly lettings I stayed in when I was in college.

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I'm sure many of us will have fond (or not-so-fond) memories of tiny rooms filled with damp and mould.

Student accommodation is not known for being comfortable. Most places are "basic", which is usually another way of saying that they are freezing in winter and were last decorated in the 1970s.

However, UCD's latest student Ashfield complex, which boasts 354 bedrooms, is bright and spacious - and it's actually fit to live in, which makes a nice change from a lot of student lettings.

The addition of Ashfield brings to 3,164 the number of student beds at UCD, one-third of which are for first years.

Ashfield comes complete with a fully-equipped laundry: a wall of washing machines and driers. Irish mammies across the country will be delighted to know that their sons and daughters will have a place to wash their clothes - if they arrive home with a bag full of washing at the weekend, they can't blame a lack of facilities.

The state-of-the-art apartments have six private, ensuite bedrooms and a shared living area. A room at Ashfield will be €7,929 for the academic year, about €881 per month over the nine-month period, at the upper end of costs for UCD campus accommodation.

Costs are benchmarked against the private sector and other purpose-built student offerings: private student accommodation across the road from UCD costs a minimum of €245 per week, compared with about €208 a week at Ashfield.

So, will Ashfield's laundry ensure its living quarters are forever free of smelly sock aromas? Probably not - although it might free weary parents from weekends of washing clothes.

Irish Independent

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