VENDÉE GLOBE RACE TRACKER

MSL Mercedes-Benz Kilcullen Voyagers
PRIMARY SCHOOLS INITIATIVE

The Vendée Globe is a round-the-world single-handed yacht race, sailed non-stop and without assistance. On the 6th November 2016, Enda O’Coineen will be the first ever Irishman to take part in this incredible race.

This fun course map can be used to join in the adventure and follow Enda’s journey as he sails around the world from west to east. Click here to download a PDF version of the map

Alternatively, send us your details and we will post the course map directly to you, absolutely FREE, click here to apply.

Join in the adventure and follow Enda’s journey as he sails around the world from west to east.

You can follow his adventure through live tracking, weekly videos, and fun lesson plans aimed at teaching children about the importance of the ocean.

Cartoonist and Ocean Literacy Advocate Dr John Joyce has created fun educational lessons, each supported with additional videos and recourses online. You can see more here.

There are great prizes for participating classes including school trips to explore Hook Lighthouse, EPIC Ireland, and one of the Marine Institute’s amazing research ships.

This initiative is proudly brought to you by the Atlantic Youth Trust and MSL Mercedes-Benz.

The Atlantic Youth Trust is a youth development, cultural integration, and maritime education initiative that will use a tall ship to bring together young people from Northern Ireland and the Republic for life-changing adventures.

ASK ENDA

Send Enda Your Questions

Kilcullen Voyager has three satellite sytems on board allowing Enda to access email and the internet.

All young Kilcullen Voyagers and Teachers are welcome to ask Enda a question. We'll do our best to send them all onto Enda once a week and the answers will be posted on this section of website.

Click here to submit your question

ENDA'S VIDEO DIARY

How to shave with no mirror

Day 23: A tough day for Enda

Day 21: Poetry reading by Enda

Equator crossing

Day 7: A special message to all Kilcullen Voyagers

Day 5: Things are looking good

A dream come true

KILCULLEN COMPETITION TIME

WIN a class tour of Epic Ireland

WIN a visit from Enda O'Coineen to your class

LESSON 1: THERE IS ONLY ONE OCEAN

SUBJECT: GEOGRAPHY

Aim/Learning Objective

Even though ancient mariners talked of ‘Sailing the Seven Seas’, there really is only ONE ocean with connections between every part.

This is why pollution in the North Atlantic can spread to the South Atlantic and from there to the Mediterranean, the North and South Pacific Oceans, the Indian Ocean, the Arctic and Antarctic.

Materials

Bowl or large plastic tray.

Seven flat stones.

Vegetable dye.

The Experiment
The Method

Take a large deep tray, place seven stones in it to represent the Continents of the world – Europe, Asia, Africa, North America, South America, the Arctic and the Antarctic and pour in enough tap water to cover the base of the tray.

Then, pour a few drops of vegetable dye into the water at the centre of the tray.

As you watch, you will see the dye spread outwards and eventually reach every part of the tray, just as pollution in one ocean can reach any part of the world.

LESSON 2: THE OCEAN IS A MEANS OF TRANSPORT

SUBJECT: HISTORY

Aim/Learning Objective

To introduce students to the importance of the Ocean as a means of transport, both in the present and in the past. Students will also explore the subject of emigration through role-play.

Materials

Students will need access to historical information, both online and in a library.

The Experiment

As an island nation, Ireland depends on ships to transport people and goods in and out of our country. The Irish Maritime Development Office (IMDO) estimate that the overall tonnage of ship cargo being imported into the island of Ireland (North and South) is growing year on year.

Think about all the things in your home. How many of them do you think come into Ireland from other countries? Then think about all the food we consume. Where do the vegetables and fruit come from? Where does the fish and meat come from? Where does the fuel for our cars, lorries and heating come from? Chances are that a great deal of it comes into Ireland by sea.

On the 11th April 1912, the brand new White Star Line passenger ship RMS Titanic called to the port of Cobh in Co. Cork on her last stop before crossing the Atlantic for New York. Two small ships, the paddle steamers Ireland and America, ferried 123 Irish passengers out to the waiting liner as she anchored offshore.

It was the last time that Titanic saw land before her Atlantic crossing, which ended in disaster when she struck an iceberg and sank. Of the Irish passengers on board only 54 survived. What must it have been like to board the Titanic on that fateful day?

Pretend that you are one of the Irish passengers that boarded the Titanic at Cobh.

What are you feeling as you leave Ireland?

Are you sad to go, or are you excited about a new life in America?

LESSON 3: THE OCEAN IS A MAJOR INFLUENCE ON THE WORLD'S WEATHER

SUBJECT: SCIENCE

Aim/Learning Objective

To understand just how the Ocean influences our weather.

Because the Ocean is the largest single feature on our planet – covering over two thirds of its surface - it absorbs most of the heat energy reaching us from the Sun. This energy helps drive ocean currents all over the world. These currents – be they warm or cool – influence the climate of the countries they pass. Fresh water evaporating from the Ocean to form clouds is vital in the production of rain, which waters crops, fills rivers and lakes, and provides drinking water for living things all over the Earth.

This global circulation of seawater takes place because warm water is less dense than cold water and rises to the surface of the Sea, flowing north and south towards the North and South Poles as cooler water rises to replace it at the Equator. At the Poles, the water cools again and sinks. It then flows back to the Equator where it is warmed by the Sun and rises again, completing the cycle.

The heat of the Sun at the equator also causes water from the Ocean to evaporate, falling back again as rain and driving tropical storms such as hurricanes.

EXPERIMENT 1:
HOW RAIN FORMS AT SEA

Materials

Transparent glass bowl half filled with warm water.

Enough kitchen film to cover the bowl.

The Method

Place the kitchen film over the bowl of warm water.

Water from the bowl will evaporate into the ‘atmosphere’ of the bowl, condense on the kitchen film (as rain does in rain clouds) and run back down into the bowl.

This is how rainclouds form over the ocean, creating rain.

Consider how much water is in the bowl and how much is in the Ocean. Now you can see how powerful an effect the Ocean has on our weather.

EXPERIMENT 2:
HOW COLD WATER SINKS

Materials

Ice cubes made with coloured water (use ink or vegetable dye).

Transparent glass bowl, two thirds filled with warm water.

The Method

Remove the kitchen film from the last experiment.

Make sure the water in the bowl is still warm Place one or two coloured ice cubes in the bowl and leave it to stand perfectly still.

Cold, coloured water from the ice cubes will melt from the ice cubes and sink towards the bottom of the bowl – just as ocean currents sink in the cold conditions of the North and South Poles.

LESSON 4: THE OCEAN IS A SOURCE OF ENERGY

SUBJECT: SCIENCE

Aim/Learning Objective

To show how the forces of the ocean can be used to generate sustainable energy.

While the harvesting of sustainable energy may seem like a modern idea, Ireland has harnessed tidal power since 619 AD when the first Nendrum Monastery Mill was built on an island in Strangford Lough. This mill, which was rebuilt in 787 AD, used water from the incoming tide to fill a millpond. When the tide went out, water from the millpond was released through a sluice gate over a waterwheel, which in powered the millstone of the mill, grinding flour. It is the oldest example of a tidal mill anywhere in the world.

Today in Strangford Lough a far more modern tidal power device called SeaGen has operated since 2008. It is expected to be removed shortly, having yielded a great deal of useful research information.

Meanwhile, three national ocean energy test sites have been set up around the Irish coast to try out new wave energy designs - at Galway Bay, Belmullet in County Mayo and at Ringaskiddy, Co. Cork.

Ocean energy comes from a number of sources including oil and gas, wave power, tidal power and offshore wind. Ireland is home to all of these forms of energy.

EXPERIMENT:
DEMONSTRATE HOW ENERGY CAN BE HARVESTED FROM RUNNNING WATER

Materials

Child’s plastic windmill.

A source of running water (a tap).

The Method

Place the kitchen film over the bowl of warm water.

Then introduce the child’s windmill sideways to the stream (see below).

The windmill will turn, propelled by the water flow.

Larger versions of this idea have been used to harness water power for centuries in such devices as Nendrum Mill and in far bigger machines, such as SeaGen.

LESSON 5: THE PROBLEM WITH PLASTIC!

SUBJECT: SCIENCE

Aim/Learning Objective

To understand that our everyday activities can affect the health of the Ocean and to understand how we can safely dispose of plastic waste to protect the Ocean from harm.

Materials

Students are asked to bring in one piece of clean plastic packaging (a small plastic bottle, plastic wrapping, a drinks can separator etc.).

Discussion

Did you know that plastic fishing nets that have become caught on the seabed and lost continue to go on trapping and killing fish that will never be harvested? We call this ‘ghost fishing’’! Turtles and other marine animals can be choked by floating transparent plastic bags that look like the juicy jellyfish they feed on. Drink can separators can trap fish and seabirds that put their head through the holes.

Look at the examples of plastic packaging you have in the classroom. How do you think each one of these could affect marine animals if it was carelessly dumped into the Ocean? Could they choke on it? Could they become trapped in it? How could it damage them?

And, most importantly, how can we stop this plastic litter reaching the Ocean in the first place? Talk about ways in which we could all help with this and finally, put all the plastic packaging brought in by the class is gathered up by the teacher in the schools Green Bin.

LESSON 6: IRISH SUBMARINE PIONEER JOHN PHILIP HOLLAND

SUBJECT: HISTORY

Aim/Learning Objective

To introduce students to John Philip Holland the famous Irish submarine pioneer. Students will also learn how submarines float and sink by building a simple working model submarine.

Materials

Students will need access to historical information, both online and in a library.

To conduct the experiment, they will need a deep basin of water, a small plastic drink bottle, plasticene, a flexible straw or tube, and scissors.

EXPERIMENT:
DEMONSTRATE HOW SUBMARINES FLOAT AND SINK

Taking particular care, cut a line of holes along one edge of the plastic bottle from the top to the bottom. IT IS RECOMMENDED THAT TEACHERS CUT THE HOLES IN THE BOTTLES FOR THE CLASS.

Insert the bendy part of the straw into the neck of the bottle and seal it with a piece of hand-warmed plasticene so that it is watertight.

Submerge the bottle in the bowl of water with the holes upwards so that the air inside escapes and the bottle sinks. (This is what happens when a real submarine lets water into its ballast tanks and submerges).

Turn the bottle so that the slots are now pointing downwards. (This is what happens when a submarine reaches its required depth and shuts its ballast tank vents).

Then blow gently down the straw. Air will enter the bottle and it will rise to the surface – just as a real submarine does when it ‘blows ballast’.

LESSON 7: SHIPWRECKS, SUBMERSIBLES AND... PRESSURE!

SUBJECT: SCIENCE

In spite of the fact that almost two thirds of our planet is covered by the Ocean, more people have walked on the surface of the Moon (12) than have ever visited the deepest part of the Ocean (3). One person who has is the famous film director James Cameron (The Terminator, The Abyss, Avatar and Titanic) who, on 26th March 2012, piloted the miniature submarine DEEPSEA CHALLENGE to a depth of almost 11 kilometres in the Marianas trench in the Pacific.

This adventure followed in the footsteps of Jacques Picard and Don Walsh who reached that depth in 1961 in the bathyscaphe Trieste. The wreck of the RMS Titanic, which featured in James Cameron’s epic film was first discovered in 1985 by a joint expedition involving the American Wood Hole Oceanographic Institute and the French marine research body IFREMER, using a Remotely Operated Vehicle or ‘ROV’.

Ireland has its own deep-water ROV Holland One (named after the famous Irish submarine pioneer) which is operated by the Marine Institute. This little craft is too small to carry a crew and is controlled instead by cable from a ship on the surface. It can dive to 3,000 metres and has undertaken surveys of the Mid Atlantic Ridge where it discovered volcanic ‘smokers’ pouring boiling seawater up into the ocean from the deep seabed below.

So what makes the deep ocean so difficult to visit?

The largest obstacle to extremely deep diving is the enormous pressure of water squeezing in on anything at that depth.

Aim/Learning Objective

To understand just how little of the world’s seabed has ever been visited directly by human beings and to look at the effect of water pressure at extreme depths.

Materials

Washing up bowl or bucket of water

Plastic bags

The Method

To experience the effects of water pressure fill a bowl or kitchen sink with water, place your hand in a plastic bag and then gradually lower it into the liquid. Even at the extremely shallow depth of a few centimetres, the water pressure is enough to ‘shrink wrap’ the plastic around your hand.

Now imagine what the pressure would be like if you had almost 11 KILOMETRES of water on top of you!

VOYAGER VIDEOS

Team Ireland Vendée Globe Challenge Promo

Enda O'Coineen - Pre Start Interview

One Minute interview with Enda

What will Enda eat during the Vendee Globe?

Kilcullen Voyager Sunrise Sailing

Meet Andrew 'Hammy' Baker - Team Ireland