Sunday 11 December 2016

New UCD business course stands out at 590

Published 17/08/2015 | 06:00

Quantitative Business, a modified version of UCD’s Economics and Finance degree, has made offers for its 50 places at 590 points.
Quantitative Business, a modified version of UCD’s Economics and Finance degree, has made offers for its 50 places at 590 points.

A new course that aims to address big business's demand for data-analytics skills has been a stand-out performer in the first year that it has appeared on the CAO list.

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Quantitative Business, a modified version of UCD's Economics and Finance degree, has made offers for its 50 places at 590 points. It has the second-highest points requirement excluding medicine, where points are combined with the result of an aptitude test, and is five points behind Trinity College's niche Nanoscience degree, which is at 595 this year.

The UCD course combines a BSc in Economics and Finance and a new BSc in Business Analytics as an omnibus entry.

The degree that students graduate with will depend on the options they choose.

UCD's business dean Ciarán Ó hOgartaigh said the course was designed to meet employers' demands and would teach students to use data to solve business problems.

UCD's description of the course says "business analytics is about making the best possible use of the huge volumes of data that are now created every day in every sector of business, from social media to traditional manufacturing... it involves processing that data to find patterns that can lead to insight, predictions and better decisions".

Prof Ó hOgartaigh said that bodies like the IDA and Enterprise Ireland had told UCD that there was a huge demand for graduates with analytics skills.

"The whole analytics sector is really burgeoning and there's a whole lot of opportunities there, not only from the companies like Google and so on, but also Paddy Power and retailers," he said.

"We have a master's programme in business analytics at the moment and we thought that putting an undergraduate programme in would focus the demand and give more visibility at an undergraduate level as well."

He said graduates would also have career opportunities in areas like stockbroking, investment banking and the major consulting firms. The course lasts three years, with the option to take a year's internship to make it four years.

Prof O hOgartaigh said having an aggregated course would give students more choice.

Irish Independent

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