Monday 21 August 2017

LC Chemistry, Physics and Accounting: Accounting candidates taxed to the limit with VAT exam poser

Leaving Certificate students Tomas Janulevicius, Daniel Lyne and Patrick Hajdul after sitting the Physics Honours Paper at Douglas Community School in Cork. Photo: Daragh Mc Sweeney
Leaving Certificate students Tomas Janulevicius, Daniel Lyne and Patrick Hajdul after sitting the Physics Honours Paper at Douglas Community School in Cork. Photo: Daragh Mc Sweeney
Katherine Donnelly

Katherine Donnelly

A taxing question on VAT may have thrown candidates sitting the Leaving Certificate higher level accounting exam.

It was question 7, on tabular statements, and candidates had to calculate VAT three times.

Eamon Scully, a subject representative for the Association of Secondary Teachers Ireland (ASTI) said students would not have seen VAT in great detail in any of the sample questions, and it would have puzzled them.

Mr Scully, of Maria Immaculate Community School, Dunmanway, Co Cork, said overall it was a paper that was fair to all.

"Those who were less prepared had a chance to score on each question, while those who were well prepared would have recognised the more challenging material," he said.

Mr Scully said on some questions, such as question 6, candidates would have needed to have "a lot of mileage clocked up" to get through them in the allotted time.

According to Mr Scully, question 4, on departmental final accounts, would have been a "big surprise".

While it is on the syllabus and it was a "very nice" question, he said it would have been expected more as a long question 1 than a short question.

Mr Scully described the ordinary level paper as "very fair".

Earlier in the day, Leaving Certificate students sat Physics, while a small number did a combined Physics and Chemistry paper.

Teresa Considine, a subject representative for the ASTI, and a teacher at St Flannan's College, Ennis, Co Clare, described the higher level Physics paper as "fair".

She said section A was in line with other years. In section B, "students found they had good choice but there were two-and-a-half questions on modern physics, which might have suited some, but not others".

Ms Considine regarded question 6 as "nice" and was "happy to see that it included the earlier part of the course and was not just confined to simple harmonic motion".

In question 12, she said applied maths students "would have had an advantage".

Pat Doyle, of the Institute of Education, Dublin, noted the way "separate and sizeable topics" were combined in three section B questions; 7, 8 and 9.

He said, traditionally, they would have appeared in questions by themselves, adding that "the examiners appear to be designing the paper to ensure that students cover the entire course".

Ms Considine said there was "nothing out of the ordinary" with the ordinary level paper.

Students are kept busy to the end

Junior Certificate Technical Graphics candidates were kept busy yesterday, according to teacher Michael Leyden.

Mr Leyden, a subject representative for the TUI, said at higher level, section B would have kept candidates busy to the end, particularly question 2, where students were required to draw two separate rotations.

He said ordinary level was fair, but, again, section B question 2 "required a lot of work".

In the afternoon's papers for Materials Technology (wood), Mr Leyden, of Abbey Vocational School, Donegal Town, said section A at higher level "would not have presented too much trouble for the well-prepared candidate, although section B, question 3 (iv) "sought a very precise answer". The ordinary level paper was "fair".

Irish Independent

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