Thursday 29 September 2016

Aras Attracta heavily criticised in new HIQA inspection report

Eilish O'Regan Health Correspondent

Published 01/04/2015 | 11:28

Aras Attracta
Aras Attracta

The residential home for people with an intellectual disability, Aras Attracta, has been strongly criticised in a new inspection report.

  • Go To

The centre in Swinford Mayo, the centre of a television exposé in early December, was re-visited by the Health Information and Quality Authority in mid-January.

The upsetting images from Aras Attracta - such as Mary Maloney being force-fed - is an abuse of power
The upsetting images from Aras Attracta - such as Mary Maloney being force-fed - is an abuse of power
SHOCKING: A secene from the Prime Time investigation showing Ivy McGinty being dragged across the floor

The inspectors found that, while stricter measures were in place to protect residents from abuse, they were not activated in all areas of the centre - and some residents’ privacy and dignity was not supported within the facility.

While procedures were in place to protect residents from being harmed or suffering abuse, the inspection revealed they had not been consistently implemented in all areas of the centre.

Read more: Aras Attracta residents sent over 500 Christmas cards - and flowers and gifts - in public's show of support

This included the risk of unauthorised access to living areas, staff not implementing agreed positive behaviour support arrangements and issues relating to the use of medication to manage behaviour

Pictured: Mary Maloney (far right in chair), a resident of Aras Attracta residential care centre being force-fed by a staff member while other resident Mary Garvan (far left) is also in the room Photo: RTE
Pictured: Mary Maloney (far right in chair), a resident of Aras Attracta residential care centre being force-fed by a staff member while other resident Mary Garvan (far left) is also in the room Photo: RTE
Ivy McGinty a resident of Aras Attracta residential care centre. A staff member kicks Ivy. Photo: RTE
Pictured: Sheila Ryan, sister of Mary Garvan who is a resident in Aras Attracta Residential Home in Swinford Co.Mayo. RTE Investigation Unit report "Inside Bungalow 3". Photo: RTE
Pictured: Ivy McGinty, a 53 year old resident of Aras Attracta residential care centre. Photo: RTE
Pictured: Ivy McGinty, a 53 year old resident of Aras Attracta residential care centre. Photo: RTE
Pictured: Ivy McGinty, a resident of Aras Attracta residential care centre. A staff member sits on top of Ivy in the chair.Photo: RTE
Photo: RTE
Pictured: Mary Garvan, a 65 year old resident of Aras Attracta residential care centre. Photo: RTE
Pictured: Ivy McGinty, a 53 year old resident of Aras Attracta residential care centre. Photo: RTE
Pictured: Ivy McGinty, a resident of Aras Attracta residential care centre. Ivy is being dragged around the floor by a staff member.Photo: RTE

According to the report, staffing arrangements were not adequate to meet the needs of residents at times. There were also limited opportunities for some residents to participate in social activities.

The inspectors also found that some residents’ communication requirements had not been adequately met, such as inconsistent assessment of communication support needs and a lack of access to a telephone.

Inspectors also identified significant improvements required to risk management, fire safety and infection control measures - and unsafe medication practices were also uncovered.

Read more: 'I'm shocked beyond words' - Families react to harrowing undercover Prime Time footage from inside care home

Some areas of the physical environment had not been maintained in a clean and hygienic condition, according to the recent report.  

In centre 2 of the facility, some residents were smoking unsupervised and inspectors saw one resident falling on a wet floor. One staff member was also found to continually approach a resident, despite being asked by another staff member to allow the resident space.

The number of residents that had been identified in each bungalow did not reflect the actual number of residents that were living in one of these bungalows. Aside from their bedrooms, there was nowhere in the bungalow for residents with challenging behaviour to spend time in a quiet environment.

Online Editors

Read More

Promoted articles

Editor's Choice

Also in Irish News