Wednesday 26 April 2017

€86 million science and engineering research institute opens at the University of Limerick

Dr. Peter Hammond, UL Faculty of Science & Engineering, Paul Weaver, Bernal Chair in Composite Materials, An Taoiseach Enda Kenny and Prof Walker, Bernal Chair in Pharmaceutical Powder Engineering at UL at the launch of the Bernal Institute at the University of Limerick.
Pic Sean Curtin True Media.
Dr. Peter Hammond, UL Faculty of Science & Engineering, Paul Weaver, Bernal Chair in Composite Materials, An Taoiseach Enda Kenny and Prof Walker, Bernal Chair in Pharmaceutical Powder Engineering at UL at the launch of the Bernal Institute at the University of Limerick. Pic Sean Curtin True Media.
David Egan, Senior Researcher at the University of Limerick,UL President Prof Don Barry, An Taoiseach Enda Kenny and Prof Walker, Bernal Chair in Pharmaceutical Powder Engineering at UL at the launch of the Bernal Institute at the University of Limerick. Pic Sean Curtin True Media.
David Egan, Senior Researcher at the University of Limerick, UL President Prof Don Barry and An Taoiseach Enda Kenny at the launch of the Bernal Institute at the University of Limerick. Pic Sean Curtin True Media.
Pic Sean Curtin True Media.
Edmond Magner, Faculty of Science & Engineering - University of Limerick, UL President Prof Don Barry, An Taoiseach Enda Kenny and Dr Mary Shire, Vice President Research at UL at the launch of the Bernal Institute at the University of Limerick. Pic Sean Curtin True Media.
Katherine Donnelly

Katherine Donnelly

An €86 million science and engineering research institute, part of whose work aims to create longer-life batteries for the electric car market, has opened at the University of Limerick.

The Bernal Institute houses 260 researchers and is at the cutting edge of advances in new materials, including those in use in pharmaceuticals and medicine

Among the projects being conducted at the institute is the search for new materials for rechargeable batteries that will extend battery life.

This holds the promise of significant implications for mobile computing and telecommunications, and also for the electric vehicle market, allowing for smaller and lighter batteries that can hold more charge for longer and maintain performance over the lifetime of the product.

The wide-ranging areas of research at Bernal also include the  development of a new metallic alloy, nickel titanium, in partnership with Cook Medical for use in minimally invasive medical devices such as guidewires for stents and catheters,  which are used when a patient is under x-ray.

The new Institute, opened today by Taoiseach Enda Kenny,  is named for John Desmond Bernal, one of the most influential scientists of the 20th Century who was born in Nenagh, County Tipperary.

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