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Saturday 30 August 2014

Dunphy on writing Keane's memoir: "While I was trying to protect him, he was trying to protect himself"

Aishling Phelan

Published 23/01/2014 | 12:59

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Roy Keane with Eamon Dunphy after the publication of Keane's biography
Roy Keane with Eamon Dunphy after the publication of Keane's biography

Sports pundit Eamon Dunphy has said he would have liked to write Roy Keane’s upcoming autobiography.

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‘‘It’s a book most writers would want to do,’’ he told independent.ie.

The commentator said Keane was the most ‘‘fascinating player in the country’’ and said ‘‘[Roy] doesn’t talk in clichés, he just tells it like it is.’’

He welcomed the news that novelist Roddy Doyle will team up with the sports star for his new book.

‘‘It’s an innovative idea and a good one because Roddy can be detached and write with an objective view,’’ he said.

Reflecting on his own experience of writing with the ex-footballer for his first set of memoirs he said, ‘‘There was massive constraints and I wouldn’t have done it for anyone except him.’’

‘‘Roddy will find it much easier because Roy will be free of constraints and will be able to talk with real freedom,’’ he explained.

He recalled how it was difficult for the iconic footballer to fully open-up for the first volume of his autobiography.

‘‘A lot has happened since I wrote for him and now he is in a position to be much more candid and that was a problem for us at the time.

‘‘I was trying to protect him, he was trying to protect himself,’’ he said.

He has admitted that he never thought the football manager would approach him about writing the second book.

The 68-year-old co-wrote his earlier memoir, Keane: The Autobiography, which resulted in controversy and a hefty fine when the sports star revealed he set out to hurt Alf-Inge Haaland in 2001.

Dunphy said he expected that the book would be a huge seller and said, ‘‘it’s something I’m really looking forward to."

Offering advice to award-winning writer Doyle he said, ‘‘When you’re ghost writing it’s important that you use a voice that suits the person. It’s not your voice, it’s Roy Keane’s voice.’’

He first heard about the planned writing partnership in a newspaper.

Speaking about Keane he said, ‘‘He’s courteous, generous and funny and has a lovely wife and kids who are really nice people.’’

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