Tuesday 26 September 2017

Dual citizens of ban nations can enter US with Irish passports

Dual citizens from the seven designated countries will be allowed travel to the US if they have an Irish passport. (Stock picture)
Dual citizens from the seven designated countries will be allowed travel to the US if they have an Irish passport. (Stock picture)

Niall O'Connor, Alan O'Keeffe and Kevin Doyle

Irish citizens who have dual nationality with one of the seven countries covered by a US travel ban will be able to enter the US.

Dual citizens from the seven designated countries will be allowed travel to the US if they have an Irish passport.

And it emerged yesterday that the person refused entry to the US at the pre-clearance facility at Dublin Airport as a result of President Trump's anti-terrorism measure is legally resident in Ireland and works in this country.

A spokesman for the US embassy in Dublin said: "The executive order does not restrict the travel of dual nationals, so long as they hold the passport of an unrestricted country and possess a valid US visa."

The issue of pre-clearance arrangements at Irish airports dominated yesterday's Cabinet meeting. Taoiseach Enda Kenny said that no Irish laws are being broken. "The Attorney General has confirmed that the issue, in terms of the legality, is a matter entirely for the United States courts," he said.

Read more: Irish passport holders will be allowed to travel to the US if they are originally from one of the seven countries, US Embassy confirms

Fianna Fáil leader Micheál Martin said there was 'no logic to the ban in terms of what it
sets out to achieve. US citizens have been responsible for the majority of the heinous acts
carried out on US soil.' Photo: Gerry Mooney
Fianna Fáil leader Micheál Martin said there was 'no logic to the ban in terms of what it sets out to achieve. US citizens have been responsible for the majority of the heinous acts carried out on US soil.' Photo: Gerry Mooney

Responding to calls for the Government to withdraw its facilitation of pre-clearance desks in Dublin and Shannon, Mr Kenny said: "In so far as Ireland is concerned, we are in compliance with human rights legislation and in accordance with our own Constitution. Pre-clearance is an important element for Ireland and it is available in Shannon and in Dublin. Many other airports have sought it."

Some 1.4 million people used the pre-clearance facilities at Dublin and Shannon last year. Fianna Fáil leader Micheál Martin said there was "no logic to the ban in terms of what it sets out to achieve. US citizens have been responsible for the majority of the heinous acts carried out on US soil".

Sinn Féin leader Gerry Adams also urged the Taoiseach to contact the White House to express his unhappiness with the travel ban. The Government had to make sure that this "fundamentally unjust order is not used in Irish airports", he said.

An Aer Lingus spokesman said customers denied entry to flights to the US would receive a refund or can change their flight date to a later date free of charge. It is understood that all airlines send details of passengers travelling to the US to the US authorities. The airlines are informed later if certain individuals will not be permitted into America and they pass on that information to the passengers.

A source at Dublin Airport said it was unlikely people affected by the new ban would turn up at the airport as they would already know.

Bodies such as the Immigrant Council of Ireland and the Irish Association of Non-Governmental Development Organisations have criticised President Trump's order.

Irish Independent

Editor's Choice

Also in Irish News