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Thursday 8 December 2016

Drivers don't need Leaving Cert - just a full, clean driving licence

Anne-Marie Walsh

Published 18/02/2016 | 02:30

More than 240 workers at the light rail network, including drivers, ticket inspectors and control office staff, want better pay and conditions. Photo: Caroline Quinn
More than 240 workers at the light rail network, including drivers, ticket inspectors and control office staff, want better pay and conditions. Photo: Caroline Quinn

The Luas driver job specification does not state that you need to have your Leaving Certificate, but it does require you to have a full, clean driver's licence.

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Candidates are told at interview that they will be undertaking shift work, but they get every second weekend off.

On top of their basic pay, which ranges from €35,901 in their first year to €42,247 in year nine, drivers get a number of benefits.

In transport circles, many of these have been described as a "Rolls Royce" package.

They include:

■ An income protection scheme, paid by the company.

■ An annual 6.5pc bonus, which 99pc of staff get, ranging from €2,500 for drivers and ticket inspectors to €3,000 for traffic supervisors.

■ A pension contribution of 5pc from the employer and 5pc from the employee.

■ A death-in-service lump sum worth three times basic salary.

The drivers now want:

■ New pay scales ranging from €41,895 to €64,993 to be introduced by January next year.

■ A shorter drive time of three hours and 15 minutes on some routes, including the Green line, which includes preparation time. This compares with the current maximum drive time of three hours and 45 minutes, which does not include preparation time.

■ An increase in their annual bonus from 6.5pc to 10pc of pay.

■ A free GP service.

■ Higher rates of sick pay.

Their demands would cost the company over €19m - far more than the claims submitted by other staff.

The demands made by other staff include:

■ An improvement in maternity leave pay, and a lump-sum death benefit worth five times their pay rather than three times.

■ A 10pc pension contribution by the employer after 10 years.

■ An increase in holidays from 24 days to 27, after 10 years with the company.

■ Overtime at double time, rather than time-and-a-half.

Irish Independent

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