Wednesday 7 December 2016

'Death drivers' treat roads as a playground,' warns the RSA

Ryan Nugent

Published 29/07/2016 | 02:30

The RSA’s Brian Farrell said that a boy-racer culture was an
issue and that Cork was a major problem area. Stock Image
The RSA’s Brian Farrell said that a boy-racer culture was an issue and that Cork was a major problem area. Stock Image

'Death drivers' in rural areas of the country are using roads as a playground, according to the Road Safety Authority (RSA) - but it's not Donegal that we need to be worried about.

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Until this week, there had only been one road death in the county this year - although that figure has now risen to six.

However, it is Cork that has, by some distance, the most road deaths in the country in 2016, with a quite staggering 17.

The RSA's Brian Farrell said that a boy-racer culture was an issue, with a high proportion of young drivers dying in crashes, and that Cork was a major problem area.

"There's a drip, drip, drip of road deaths in Cork and it's under the radar," Mr Farrell said.

"There is a particular racing culture along the border areas, particularly Donegal, but the problems in Cork are part of a pattern repeated all over the country. It's mostly young men."

A lack of gardaí in rural areas of the country may also be a factor, he said.

"There is a proportion out there that treat the roads as a playground and they see the car as a source of entertainment.

"They have no problem putting their lives and the lives of others at risk.

"There is a subgroup that you could only classify as death drivers - they're fuelled up on alcohol and they're speeding," added Mr Farrell.

There have been 102 roads deaths in Ireland so far in 2016, with the worst-hit counties being: Cork (17); Limerick (10); Tipperary (9); Dublin, Galway and Meath (eight each) and Donegal (six).

Irish Independent

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