Sunday 28 May 2017

'She wanted it to stop, all the phone calls and text messages' - Garda who interviewed woman accused of murdering her colleague told court

Marta Herda (29), arrives at the Central Criminal Court in Dublin. Pic Collins Courts
Marta Herda (29), arrives at the Central Criminal Court in Dublin. Pic Collins Courts

Natasha Reid

The garda, who interviewed a woman accused of murdering a colleague, has been asked what he thought she meant when she said: ‘I wanted it to stop’.

The woman is charged with murdering the man by driving him into a harbour, where he drowned.

Gardai interviewed her on video tape a few months later, and portions of these interviews were played to the Central Criminal Court Tuesday morning on the tenth day of her trial.

Marta Herda of Pairc Na Saile, Emoclew Road, Arklow, Co Wicklow is charged with the murder of 31-year-old Csaba Orsos on March 26, 2013.

The 29-year-old Polish woman has pleaded not guilty to murdering the Hungarian at South Quay, Arklow.

They both worked at Brook Lodge Hotel in Aughrim and the trial heard that he was in love with her, but that she didn’t feel the same way. She told gardai he had spent two years following her, phoning her and sending her text messages.

Both had been in Ms Herda’s car when it went into the water that morning. Ms Herda escaped at the harbour but Mr Orsos’ body was found on a nearby beach later that day.

Detective Sergeant Fergus O’Brien was cross examined by the defence this morning about the interviews that he had conducted with Ms Herda following her arrest in August 2013.

He’d asked if she had driven into the water deliberately. She said she hadn’t. He asked why she had made the following statement to the gardai on the day of the incident: “When I drove into the water, I wanted this all to stop.”

She replied that she did want it all to stop and for him to leave her alone.

“She wanted it to stop, all the phone calls and text messages she was getting,” testified D Sgt O’Brien.

She had told gardai that there was screaming in the car that morning and Giollaiosa O Lideadha SC, defending, suggested that she was describing what was happening in the car when she said she wanted it to stop.

“I suppose, yes, it’s one interpretation,” said the witness.

Mr O Lideadha suggested that she wasn’t saying that she ‘did this’ to stop the texts over the two years.

“But, you think it’s open to that interpretation,” said the barrister.

“Yes,” he replied, explaining that this was a five-minute segment out of nine hours of interviews.

“That’s my interpretation. I’m not saying I’m right or wrong,” continued the sergeant. “It’s for others to interpret.”

The trial continues.

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