Saturday 1 October 2016

Man caught growing cannabis herb as 'cottage industry' after gardai detected suspicious smell in his car

Fiona Ferguson

Published 10/12/2015 | 16:51

Doyle had no previous convictions and came from a respectable family, the court heard.
Doyle had no previous convictions and came from a respectable family, the court heard.

A Kildare man caught growing cannabis herb as a “cottage industry” after gardai detected a suspicious smell in his car has been jailed for three years.

  • Go To

Adrian Doyle (35), of Lakelands, Naas pleaded guilty at Dublin Circuit Criminal Court to cultivation of cannabis and possession of cannabis herb at a rented property in Church View Lawns, Prosperous, Co Kildare in May 2014.

Judge Martin Nolan noted a substantial amount of cash had been found at the premises, some of which may have been the residue of a redundancy payment, but some of which was profit from the sale of cannabis. He imposed a three year jail sentence.

Garda Eoghan O'Neill told Noel Devitt BL, prosecuting, that he stopped a car driven by Doyle at a check point at St Johns Road in Dublin and noticed a smell of cannabis.

Cannabis herb valued at €4,428 was found in the car and a further search was carried out at the address in Prosperous following the seizure of bank slips and Doyle's phone from the vehicle.

Gardai found 24 cannabis plants at an early stage of growth with a potential value of €19,200; almost two and a half kilograms of dried cannabis herb valued at €48,886; as well as books related to the growing of cannabis.

During interview Doyle told gardai there was also €26,000 in cash in a laundry basket in the house.

Gda O'Neill said Doyle had no previous convictions and came from a respectable family.

He agreed with Michael Bowman SC, defending, that Doyle was not “on the garda radar” and that this was not a commercial grow house set up. He agreed Doyle appeared genuinely remorseful.

Mr Bowman said Doyle had started growing the cannabis as a “cottage industry” to be self sufficient for his own use and this had latterly “spilled over” into supplying the drug. He said Doyle was not a person with criminal associations or inclinations.

He submitted his client had done something “foolish, stupid and naive” which had escalated.

Mr Bowman said Doyle had worked for a number of years in the financial services sector before losing his job during the downturn resulting in a redundancy payment. He was now in third level education studying IT related courses.

Online Editors

Read More

Promoted articles

Editor's Choice

Also in Irish News