Friday 28 April 2017

John Gilligan and family liable for €1million legal costs in case against CAB, court rules

John Gilligan pictured with his son Darren, outside the Four Courts.
Pic Frank Mc Grath
John Gilligan pictured with his son Darren, outside the Four Courts. Pic Frank Mc Grath
John Gilligan pictured with his son Darren, outside the Four Courts. Pic Frank Mc Grath
Conor Feehan

Conor Feehan

John Gilligan and his family are to be landed with a legal bill in excess of €1m after being ordered to pay the legal costs of the Criminal Assets Bureau after their lengthy Supreme Court battle.

The Gilligans had appealed a High Court victory by the CAB to seize the three homes which were ruled to be the proceeds of crime, but in taking the case to the Supreme Court the legal bill of the State increased also.

Last month the Supreme Court ruled against Gilligan and CAB were awarded to right to take over the properties - one house beside the Jessbrook equestrian centre which he had previously lost, and two houses in Dublin.

Today the CAB were awarded their costs in pursuing the case, which will be a minimum of €1m.

John (64) and his son Darren (41) were both in court today, where they made applications for themselves and on behalf of John’s wife Geraldine and daughter Tracy for a two year stay on the seizure of two of the houses.

These were the Kildare property and a house in Corduff Avenue in Dublin.

Counsel for John Gilligan said he was 64 years old and not yet eligible for a State pension and has made enquiries of housing authorities for accommodation.

He asked for the two year halt on the seizure of the house at Corduff Avenue as he “soon may have no house to live in” and wants to “regularise his position”.

John Gilligan pictured outside the Four Courts.
Pic Frank Mc Grath
John Gilligan pictured outside the Four Courts. Pic Frank Mc Grath

A similar application was made in respect of the house at Mucklon beside the Jessbrook equestrian centre previously seized and sold-on by the CAB.

The court heard that Geraldine and Tracy Gilligan live there and that Tracy is a single mother of two, the youngest of which is in primary school.

The court was asked to put a stay on the seizure of the house until Tracy Gilligan could find council accommodation or until her daughter finished in primary school.

After a short recess the Supreme Court panel of five judges granted a three month stay on the seizure of the houses.

After the brief hearing a spokesman for the Criminal Assets Bureau said it was satisfied with the decision.

John and Darren Gilligan declined to comment before leaving the court.

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