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Sunday 21 September 2014

Frederick Thompson to apply for bail next week

Eimear Cotter

Published 29/05/2014 | 19:30

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NOTE - HE CANNOT BE CALLED FAT FREDDIE IN THE COPY AND MUST BE CALLED FREDERICK THOMPSON 

MUST PIXELATE HIS CUFFS 
NOT FOR ONLINE USE BEFORE 21.5.14

Fat Freddie Thompson arriving back in Dublin today - 20.5.14
Frederick Thompson

A DUBLIN man awaiting trial in connection with a pub row last year is expected to make a bail application to the High Court next Tuesday.

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Frederick Thompson (33) consented to remaining in custody over the weekend while his lawyers prepare an application for bail.

The accused, of Loreto Road, Maryland, Dublin, was previously refused bail in the District Court after he, along with two others, was charged with committing violent disorder.

The 33-year-old, who has not yet entered a plea, is accused of engaging in or threatening the use of violence that would cause another person to fear for their safety.

The incident, under Section 15 of the Criminal Justice (Public Order) Act is alleged to have happened at Morrissey's pub, Cork St, in Dublin 8, on January 7 last year.

Mr Thompson is facing trial on the charge, which on conviction in the Circuit Court can result in a maximum 10-year prison sentence.

This morning, Mr Thompson briefly appeared before the High Court sitting at Cloverhill courthouse. His lawyer asked for the bail application to be adjourned to next Tuesday’s High Court bail list.

Dressed in a light grey tracksuit, the married father-of-one did not address the court during the brief hearing.

Mr Thompson was previously refused bail by Judge Michael Walsh when he appeared at Dublin District Court on May 21.

On that occasion, gardai had objected to bail on the grounds that he was a flight risk. A decision on whether Mr Thompson is to be granted free legal aid was also deferred.

At a sitting of the High Court last Monday, Garrett McCormack BL, for the DPP, said that the DPP was seeking a Section Six statement under the Criminal Justice Act 2007 in relation to a financial statement.

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