Tuesday 6 December 2016

Coppers scores as coat receipts bump up profits

Gordon Deegan

Published 05/12/2011 | 05:00

IT'S a cheesy line that many a regular at the well-known nightclub Copper Face Jacks has heard -- "Get your coat, you've pulled".

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Now it seems that quite a few customers at the Harcourt Street institution in Dublin have made sure to check in those unwanted jackets as cloakroom receipts for the hotspot totalled over €215,000 last year.

The number of coats deposited before people bopped the night away helped to contribute to pre-tax profits of €6.48m at the dance venue last year, new accounts show.

The club -- where GAA fans, nurses and gardai have been known to strut their stuff on the dance floor -- reached stratospheric levels on the social scene this year as Dublin captain Bryan Cullen bellowed "See you in Coppers" as he hoisted the Sam Maguire aloft.

Yet the club has felt the recessionary pinch as accounts for Breanagh Catering Ltd, which operates the Jackson Court Hotel that houses the nightclub, reveal the pre-tax profits at the firm fell 5pc from €6.83m to €6.48m in the 12 months to the end of January last.

Accommodation

Cloakroom receipts were €217,146 -- down from €241,514 the previous year.

The amount taken in at the door added up to €2.91m, a drop of 3pc on the €3m generated in 2009. Income from accommodation fell from €426,675 to €383,697.

The company owned by former garda Cathal Jackson remains cash rich with last year's profits ensuring €32.6m was in the bank at the end of the year. The company earned almost €1m in bank interest income alone last year.

The firm's tax bill last year came to €1.1m. The wage and employment bill dropped from €3.3m to €3.1m, with the numbers employed dropping from 172 to 166 last year.

The employment costs include the pay package of €503,934 to the company's two directors, Mr Jackson and Paula Jackson -- down from the €559,040 received in 2009.

The company's fixed assets were valued at €11.5m, including a book value of €10.83m on its freehold premises.

Irish Independent

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