Sunday 4 December 2016

Waste start-up says its software can deliver reduction in emissions

Jane O'Faherty

Published 26/09/2016 | 02:30

Brendan Walsh, chief executive of SmartBin, says the company’s software can deliver savings by increasing efficiency. Photo: Mark Condren
Brendan Walsh, chief executive of SmartBin, says the company’s software can deliver savings by increasing efficiency. Photo: Mark Condren

An Irish start-up hopes to break into its home market after considerable success with waste companies abroad.

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SmartBin, which has its corporate headquarters in Dublin, says its clients can make savings of up to 40pc by following more efficient waste collection routes.

The business allows waste management firms to track the fullness of their bins and containers using ultrasonic sensors. The data is then sent back to the company via an app, which provides the customer with live details of how full each container is, and where it is located.

SmartBin also helps its customers plan more efficient routes by only sending trucks to bins that are full.

Brendan Walsh, CEO of the company, says the software delivers more savings and a reduction in carbon dioxide emissions.

"If I am using this software, I can direct my drivers to collect from full bins only," he said.

"That leads to more efficient journeys and a cut of up to 40pc of the cost. From a sustainability point of view, there are less CO2 emissions.

"We can also show you what CO2 emissions there would have been on a standard journey, compared with a more efficient journey."

SmartBin entered the market in 2011, and now has hundreds of customers in North America and Europe.

It currently employs six people in Dublin, one person in London and one person in Chicago.

While it has yet to advertise in Ireland, it hopes to expand into the domestic market in the near future.

Mr Walsh believes the recent introduction of a nationwide Internet of Things (IoT) network in Ireland will help the company, and says there is "absolutely no reason" why Ireland can't become a hub for such technology.

"Just come out to DCU Alpha and you will meet a number of innovative companies doing great things to improve the environment," he said.

"There are lots of people doing really interesting things in the area of sensor devices, especially in Ireland."

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