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Saturday 3 December 2016

Irish firm cutting costs for hospitals across the world

Published 26/09/2016 | 02:30

Stephen Daniels from Nuwave Sensor Technology with a Nuwave pathogen sensor and computer display. Photo: Frank McGrath
Stephen Daniels from Nuwave Sensor Technology with a Nuwave pathogen sensor and computer display. Photo: Frank McGrath

A Dublin air-sensor company is helping American healthcare services reduce their electricity bills with air-quality sensors.

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Products offered by NuWave Sensors, which detect pathogens and allergens in the air, are proving particularly popular in US hospitals that wish to monitor indoor air quality.

The business has also recently launched Cair sensors for homes to track particles and humidity that could spark allergic reactions.

Based in Glasnevin, NuWave Sensors has been operating for almost three years and employs 12 people in Dublin. Chief technical officer Stephen Daniels says much of their sales are in America and mainland Europe.

"We sell products all over the world, but the US is a big market for us, as is mainland Europe," he told the Irish Independent. "We sell both the NuWave and Cair sensors there, but industrials are our biggest customers, particularly in America."

The air sensors collate the information and send them to clients via a free cloud-based account. Mr Daniels added that the data tracked by the sensors could encourage hospital management to cut down on their use of air purifiers where necessary and reduce energy consumption.

"There are a lot of hospitals in the US that need to clean the air inside their wards. That's a huge cost," he said.

Meanwhile, the company's domestic sensors can help homeowners detect pathogens that may aggravate asthma or hay fever.

"With the increase of Co2 levels, certain plants like ragweed would produce more pollen," Mr Daniels said.

"The general trends are that global temperatures increase and that provides better conditions for producing pollen."

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