Saturday 29 April 2017

City footfall was down 9pc during first days of action

City centre bus stops without any buses during rush hour. Picture; Gerry Mooney
City centre bus stops without any buses during rush hour. Picture; Gerry Mooney
Allison Bray

Allison Bray

The first of three planned strike actions by Dublin Bus had a significant impact on footfall and spend in the city centre.

Each year the city experiences a boost in footfall during the fashion festival, but this was not the case during the days of industrial action.

A bus stop sign notifies commuters of industrial action. Photo: Brian Lawless/PA Wire
A bus stop sign notifies commuters of industrial action. Photo: Brian Lawless/PA Wire

The city's footfall was down by 9pc compared with Thursday and Friday of the previous week.

Richard Guiney of DublinTown said previous bus strikes had led to sales declines of between 15pc and 20pc for city centre traders, especially small, independent convenience shops that rely on passing trade.

"DublinTown fears a prolonged bus strike," he said. "Such losses are unsustainable."

Graeme McQueen, spokesman for the Dublin Chamber of Commerce, echoed his views. He said that ongoing transport strikes were eroding confidence among business people looking to create jobs and investment as well as Dublin's reputation among international investors.

"Dublin's public transport infrastructure is at saturation point on a daily basis," he said. "The significant lack of investment in our transport infrastructure over the past decade means that when one cog in the machine goes down, the city grinds to a halt.

"This has an impact on all workers and all businesses in the city."

Irish Independent

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