Irish News

Thursday 21 August 2014

Body is man who disappeared in 1983

Stephen Maguire

Published 28/04/2013 | 04:00

  • Share

A MAN has revealed how his mother waited at her kitchen window everyday for the three years before she died, waiting for her missing son to return.

  • Share
  • Go To

James McGlynn, 56, has spent the past 30 years trying to unravel the mystery of his missing brother, Noel.

An unidentified body was buried in an unmarked grave at the Holy Cross cemetery in Dunfanaghy, Co Donegal, after it was washed up on rocks nearby on June 26, 1983.

Mr McGlynn was adamant that it is his brother's body that is buried in the grave.

And his quest to prove that it was his brother who drowned is finally over after an inquest ruled that Noel's body is buried in the cemetery at Holy Cross.

Noel was 26 when he went missing after leaving his house at Ballaghderg two weeks beforehand.

An earlier inquest revealed that DNA samples taken from the body were found to match with Mr McGlynn's.

A second inquest found last week that Noel McGlynn died as a result of drowning.

Mr McGlynn revealed in court that another brother had said the body wasn't Noel's when he went to the mortuary at Letterkenny General Hospital. However, he later admitted that he did not identify the body at all because he did not "have the stomach" to see his brother.

Mr McGlynn told the court that his late mother and father, Frances and Charles McGlynn, never believed that his brother was dead and waited in vain for him to eventually return.

"My mother never got over it.

"She always thought Noel was going to come home.

"She sat in the window, looking out for him to return every single day.

"They were always waiting on the knock on the door from gardai but it never came," he said.

The court heard that Noel had been a gifted artist but had destroyed all his artworks and books before he disappeared.

He had been suffering from depression and had been attending the psychiatric services at St Conal's Hospital in Letterkenny.

Tributes were paid to gardai and especially to Dr David Barry for his foresight on preserving the DNA samples at the time.

Coroner John Cannon returned a verdict of death by drowning at the inquest in Letterkenny, Co Donegal.

Irish Independent

Read More

Editor's Choice

Also in Irish News