News Irish News

Saturday 23 August 2014

Battle of Clontarf re-enactments cost council €250k

Joyce Fegan

Published 24/04/2014 | 10:10

  • Share
Over 500 vikings took over St Anne’s Park in Raheny today for the first day of the Battle of Clontarf Festival, hosted by Dublin City Council
Over 500 vikings took over St Anne’s Park in Raheny today for the first day of the Battle of Clontarf Festival, hosted by Dublin City Council
VIKING RAIDER: Josephine Nielsen of Denmark at the re-enactment. Photo: Conor McCabe

THE successful Battle of Clontarf re-enactments which attracted crowds of more than 60,000 cost €250,000 to stage.

  • Share
  • Go To

“It was a national highlight of the Brian Boru Millennium celebrations and part of Dublin City Council's (DCC) calendar of year-round family friendly events,” said a spokesman for DCC.

Last weekend, four re-enactments of the 1,000-year-old Battle of Clontarf took place with 600 international Vikings taking part. Even though, there were no DART services from Connolly station on Easter Sunday, the huge free-entry event went off without a hitch.

The DCC spokesman said the festival was a big tourism initiative that helped to sell the capital, and that “events such as these have benefits for the local economy and play an important part in marketing Dublin as a destination”.

People travelled from all over the world to watch the re-enactments and see the action, with Viking enthusiasts flying in from Australia, New Zealand, Moscow, Texas, Iceland, the Czech Republic and Canada.

Hanna Agren (27, inset right) from Sweden travelled with several kilos of Viking jewellery to sell at the weekend's celebrations. “I filled my pockets with five kilos of jewellery as I didn't want to put it in my check-in luggage,” she said.

Dublin City councillor Nial Ring described the €250,000 event as a “great showpiece” for Dublin.

“Dublin has some wonderful attractions and we can really put on a great show when needed – the Battle of Clontarf Millennium celebration was a great collaboration and the whole city benefited,” he stated.

The councillor believes it will act as a strong precursor for the 1916 events in two years time.

“It is yet another great success for Dublin City Council and the work of its commemoration committee and events department – it augurs well for the 1916 centenary celebrations coming soon,” said Mr Ring.

DCC told the Herald that final figures and a full breakdown of costs will not be available for sometime but did disclose that the weekend's event in St Anne's Park Raheny cost €250,000 to stage.

Events to mark the millennium continue with a free exhibition in the National Museum.

Read More

Editor's Choice

Also in Irish News