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Thursday 8 December 2016

Ash cloud: Irish airspace open for business

Rosemary O'Grady

Published 25/05/2011 | 10:20

Satellite image provided by NASA, shows Grimsvotn volcano emmiting ash plume on May 21. Photo: Getty Images
Satellite image provided by NASA, shows Grimsvotn volcano emmiting ash plume on May 21. Photo: Getty Images
Passengers sleep on the floor in the main terminal at Edinburgh airport after it was shut yesterday
Joseph Gorman, Pauline Gorman and Lesley Matthews from Glasgow at Dublin Airport yesterday after their flight was cancelled
The volcanic ash cloud's expected path at 6am today, with strongest concentration in red

All flights out of Irish airspace have been given the green light - at least for the next 24 hours.

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Met Éireann said northerly winds later in the week would increase the chances of disruption to travel caused by ash from the Grímsvötn volcano, which erupted on Saturday.

Restrictions in other European countries have affected a small number of flights.

Last night, the Volcanic Ash Advisory Centre in London said there was a strong possibility the ash cloud could affect parts of Denmark, southern Norway and southwest Sweden today, with possible disruption to flights in to and out of these countries.

Meanwhile, Ryanair is in collision with the UK Civil Aviation Authorities over the ash cloud exclusion zone in Scotland.

Company spokesman Steven McNamara confirmed that Ryanair had sent two test flights to Scottish air space to fly over the so called 'red' zone which is believed to have the highest intensity of volcanic ash. They encountered no problems, he said.

Aer Lingus and Ryanair plan to operate a full schedule following yesterday's cancellations and disruption due to the Icelandic ash cloud. However, passengers are advised to check with their airlines before travelling.

The British authorities have also declared their airspace safe and the Germans have reopened Bremen and Hamburg airports .

Airspace over Berlin and Hanover, however, may be affected.

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