Monday 24 July 2017

Artefacts donated anonymously hold key to Viking history

The four objects were anonymously posted to the National Museum last week (Photo: Arthur Carron)
The four objects were anonymously posted to the National Museum last week (Photo: Arthur Carron)

Martin Grant

The mysterious discovery of ancient objects could unleash the key to the history of Vikings in Ireland, according to the country's top archaeologist.

Four objects were anonymously posted to the National Museum last week and scientists are now trying to trace the origins of the donated artefacts.

Mary Cahill, Keeper of the Irish Antiquities at the National Museum, says the finds could reveal a whole new world of undiscovered history.

The objects include a slash-copper axe from the early Bronze Age, a palstave axe and a twisted bronze ring.

Archaeologists are more interested in the discovery of a strap-tag.

The metal decorative piece is a very "unusual and rare" object that hangs from a strap or belt. It was considered a dress or fashion accessory in the medieval period.

Ms Cahill is curious by the find because it is a Scandinavian type and has not been found in Ireland before.

"It has come from the Viking world," says the archaeologist.

"It is very important to try and found out if this object was found in Ireland and where. That will give us some new and very interesting information about the movement of either Viking people or Viking objects around the country in the 10th century."

Irish Independent

Promoted articles

Editor's Choice

Also in Irish News