Irish News

Friday 1 August 2014

An Post releases new stamps to celebrate our Viking heritage

Published 24/04/2014|16:32

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This stamp features what is believed to be a 10th century Viking sword, found in Christchurch Place, Dublin. The background depicts an image from the Annals of the Four Masters. The first day cover features an image of Brian Boru, at the Battle of Clontarf in 1014.
This stamp features the Waterford Kite Brooch (c.1090), one of Ireland’s finest pieces of late 11th/early 12th century secular metalwork against a background map of Waterford City.

An Post have issued two special stamps commemorating Ireland’s Viking heritage.

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It comes as the country celebrates 1,000 years since the Battle of Clontarf.

The stamps and a very collectable first day cover, designed by Ger Garland, feature items of Viking art and a wonderful image of Brian Boru at the famous battle in 1014.

All are now available for sale at main post offices, at the Irish Stamps Shop in Dublin’s GPO or via www.irishstamps.ie.

An Post described the collection as a “a unique celebration of Ireland’s Viking heritage given the Vikings enormous influence on the history and development of this country”.

One stamp features the Waterford Kite Brooch (c.1090), one of Ireland’s finest pieces of late 11th/early 12th century secular metalwork against a background map of Waterford City.

Stamp2.jpg 

 

 

The second stamp features what is believed to be a 10th century Viking sword, found in Christchurch Place, Dublin. The background depicts an image from the Annals of the Four Masters. The first day cover features an image of Brian Boru, at the Battle of Clontarf in 1014.

Stamp1.jpg 

The first Viking raiders appeared in Irish waters in 795. The early targets of their raids were generally monasteries near the coast but, as the raids increased in frequency, the Vikings began to plunder towns and settlements further inland. Viking settlements were subsequently established at Dublin, Waterford, Wexford, Cork and Limerick. Their direct influence on Irish affairs lasted until the arrival of the Normans in 1169.

In Dublin, important Viking artefacts have been found at Wood Quay, Christchurch Place and in the Temple Bar area. Archaeological investigations in Waterford have uncovered a Viking burial site and numerous objects, including weapons and other metalwork.

Irish Independent

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